Stop being so feeble, Labour: this is how you attack the Tories | Theo Bertram

To beat Theresa May, Jeremy Corbyn must stop being so feeble. Having worked with Blair, I know how Labour can muster some attacking competence

In the past few weeks there have been some welcome signs of basic competence creeping back into the Labour operation. Three meaty policy announcements (on free school meals for all, increasing the minimum wage, and tackling late payments for small businesses) were decently prepared and served. This is a significant improvement on Labour’s announcement in January of a maximum wage cap: a policy that Jeremy Corbyn, in the middle of an interview about something else, appeared to spit out like an unexpected piece of gristle that he then tried to hide beneath his napkin.

Basic professional political competence is not enough to change the outcome of the next election, but it may help to stem the catastrophic leaking of Labour supporters to the Conservative party. What is also needed is much greater competence in attack: it is not enough to persuade people to stick with Labour; what’s important is to make it much harder for them to switch to Theresa May.

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The Danish beermakers brewing up work for autistic people

Just 16% of autistic adults are in full-time paid employment, despite the vast majority saying they want to work. This beer company aims to help.

With its collection of small vessels and hoses, plain tiled floor and bags of malt, the workplace of People Like Us in Skippinge, Denmark, is a typical brewing scene.

But for Rune Lindgreen, a 39-year-old with Asperger Syndrome, it is much more than that. Lindgreen was out of work for almost a decade before landing a job as a beer developer in this company run by autistic adults.

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Damascus: thin sheen of normality coats menace in once-friendly city

Shops open but there are hardly any customers, jets roar overhead and there are armed men everywhere in Syria’s capital

Waiters dressed for the 1930s, with pencil moustaches and slicked-back hair, spoon tabbouleh on to the plates of women who take drags on shisha pipes at the grand Selena restaurant in Damascus’s old city.

Two wedding celebrations are also under way. A singer croons in Arabic: “I love you, but that doesn’t mean I’ll stay with you.” One of the brides gets up and sways, her blue dress decorated with thousands of crystals shaped into glittering claws clinching her bare back.

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The Danish beermakers brewing up work for autistic people

Just 16% of autistic adults are in full-time paid employment, despite the vast majority saying they want to work. This beer company aims to help.

With its collection of small vessels and hoses, plain tiled floor and bags of malt, the workplace of People Like Us in Skippinge, Denmark, is a typical brewing scene.

But for Rune Lindgreen, a 39-year-old with Asperger Syndrome, it is much more than that. Lindgreen was out of work for almost a decade before landing a job as a beer developer in this company run by autistic adults.

Related: Companies fear employing people with learning disabilities, survey reveals

Related: It's time business stopped peddling lazy, damaging stereotypes of older people

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Hove tops property hotspot rankings among young professionals

East Sussex town commands an average premium of £71,000, report finds

A town on the south coast of England has cemented its place at the top of the property hotspot league for Britain’s young professionals.

For the third year running, the BN3 postcode in the seaside town of Hove, which adjoins Brighton, tops the table in England and Wales for most home sales to young professionals – defined as 25- to 44-year-olds – according to figures compiled by Lloyds Bank.

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Food nourishes mind and body. So let’s enjoy eating | Ruby Tandoh

Anxiety surrounding food is making people ill. Society needs to do more to help those who struggle

As you read this I’m probably tucking into my third chocolate bunny, with a side of hot cross bun. It wasn’t always like this. When I was 18, I was admitted to a mental health ward. I’d been swinging between anorexia and bulimia for three years, but the tipping point was a suicide attempt one night during the summer holidays after my A-levels.

Related: Bad fad – Ruby Tandoh on how clean eating turned toxic

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Food nourishes mind and body. So let’s enjoy eating | Ruby Tandoh

Anxiety surrounding food is making people ill. Society needs to do more to help those who struggle

As you read this I’m probably tucking into my third chocolate bunny, with a side of hot cross bun. It wasn’t always like this. When I was 18, I was admitted to a mental health ward. I’d been swinging between anorexia and bulimia for three years, but the tipping point was a suicide attempt one night during the summer holidays after my A-levels.

Related: Bad fad – Ruby Tandoh on how clean eating turned toxic

Related: When a woman says she's not feminist, we can do better than shout her down | Ruby Tandoh

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How Atlanta’s conservative suburbs became a frontier of liberal resistance – video

A progressive rebellion is brewing in Georgia. The special election to replace Donald Trump’s health secretary, Tom Price, should have been a shoo-in for Republicans. Instead, Paul Lewis discovers Jon Ossoff, a 30-year-old film-maker, is dominating the sixth district race as anti-Trump sentiment fuels his unlikely bid for Congress

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Can Trump defuse North Korea by acting like Ike? | Matthew d’Ancona

After decades of US dithering over the regime, it’s time for Eisenhower-style deterrence to will the peace

In December 1952, having visited the Korean front, mingled with US troops and eaten outdoor from a mess kit, President-elect Eisenhower made a statement on the Korean war. “We face an enemy,” he said, “whom we cannot hope to impress by words, however eloquent, but only by deeds – executed under circumstances of our own choosing”.

Related: Is Donald Trump the man to promote peace with North Korea? | Mark Seddon

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Mulch admired: garden of the year award goes to Helmingham Hall

Historic Houses Association gives accolade to grounds of stately home near Ipswich, managed by Xa Tollemache

When Xa Tollemache first walked out into her new garden, crossing not one but two moats into acres of flowers and vegetables, her heart sank into her new boots at the scale of the task of maintaining it.

More than 40 years later, the garden of Helmingham Hall near Ipswich in Suffolk, open to the public from May until mid-September, is about to be named the Historic Houses Association’s garden of the year, voted for by its visitors.

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Vanessa Redgrave makes directorial debut with film about refugee crisis

Documentary titled Sea Sorrow draws parallels between Shakespeare’s Tempest and the tragic story of Syrian three-year-old Alan Kurdi

The sight of a Syrian toddler’s lifeless body washed up on a Turkish beach was among the horrors that drove Vanessa Redgrave to make her directorial debut with a feature documentary about the refugee crisis, she said.

The 80-year-old Oscar-winning actor and political activist, has long campaigned for refugees, but the shocking images of three-year-old Alan Kurdi made her realise she needed to do more.

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Chetham’s new head says music school is in ‘exceptional health’

Alun Jones admits school about to open new concert venue has been through tough times but its safeguarding procedures have been ruled ‘impeccable’

It is the biggest specialist music school in the UK, producing more winners of the BBC’s Young Musician of the Year competition than its rivals, and boasting a medieval library where Friedrich Engels and Karl Marx once studied. But when Alun Jones took over as head of Chetham’s school of music in Manchester last year he inherited an institution with a troubled reputation.

The private school, where boarding fees are £31,713 per year, was recovering from a sexual abuse scandal which resulted in the jailing of its former head of music and the suicide of a violin teacher who had been due to face 77 charges of sex offences against 10 former pupils.

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Should you resist Lisa … out to lure you into saving for a property or retirement?

The Lifetime Isa was launched this month, offering a tax-free wrapper and 25% bonus. But do weigh up the pros and cons, says Harriet Meyer

You know you should save for retirement, and since the introduction of the Lifetime Isa there are more options than ever. Launched on 6 April the “Lisa” is similar to any other Isa, working as a tax-free wrapper around savings, and is available to everybody between 18 and 40.

Critics of it claim savers risk giving up valuable employer pension contributions and being stung by hefty penalties if they quit the scheme early. But stashing cash in a Lisa could be a wise retirement strategy

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Hundreds of Palestinian prisoners in Israel go on hunger strike

Thousands of prisoners expected to join rights protest led by Marwan Barghouti that has significant political backing

Hundreds of Palestinian prisoners held in Israeli jails have gone on hunger strike over conditions of captivity, with more expected to join on Monday, in one of the biggest protests in recent years.

Led by the high-profile Fatah prisoner and leader Marwan Barghouti, seen by some as a potential successor to Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas, 700 prisoners initially joined the strike, announced on Sunday evening.

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Air pollution as bad for wellbeing as partner’s death, say researchers

Authors of Can Clean Air Make You Happy? say exposure to nitrogen dioxide can be as damaging as ‘big-hitting’ life events

The effect on wellbeing of exposure to nitrogen dioxide, a gas mostly produced in diesel fumes, is comparable to the toll from losing a job, ending a relationship or the death of a partner, research suggests.

The study found a “significant and negative association” between life satisfaction and levels of the pollutant, which causes lung problems. These effects were “substantive and comparable to that of many ‘big-hitting’ life events,” according to the researchers behind Can Clean Air Make You Happy?.

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Air pollution as bad for wellbeing as partner’s death, say researchers

Authors of Can Clean Air Make You Happy? say exposure to nitrogen dioxide can be as damaging as ‘big-hitting’ life events

The effect on wellbeing of exposure to nitrogen dioxide, a gas mostly produced in diesel fumes, is comparable to the toll from losing a job, ending a relationship or the death of a partner, research suggests.

The study found a “significant and negative association” between life satisfaction and levels of the pollutant, which causes lung problems. These effects were “substantive and comparable to that of many ‘big-hitting’ life events,” according to the researchers behind Can Clean Air Make You Happy?.

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Colleagues contradict Tony Abbott’s claim he was unaware of Safe Schools’ rollout

Abbott says he spoke out against ‘terrible program’ when he became aware of it, but colleagues say the then prime minister defended it in party room

Colleagues of Tony Abbott have cast doubt on his claim that the Safe Schools anti-bullying program was only rolled out under his government because he was unaware of it.

Guardian Australia understands that Abbott defended the program in a party room meeting in 2014 and several attempts to have its funding axed by then parliamentary secretary for education, Scott Ryan, were rebuffed.

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At least 11 people suffer burns in London bar from suspected noxious chemical

Hazardous area response team seals off roads in Dalston and hundreds evacuated after incident early on Monday

At least 11 people at a London bar have suffered burns as a result of a suspected noxious substance.

It is understood that the incident in Dalston, east London, early on Monday sparked the evacuation of the venue where about 600 revellers had been at an event. About 200 had left the premises before emergency services arrived, with a further 400 evacuated from the building, believed to be a club.

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roaring waterfall rheidol country diary

Afon Rheidol When I reached the Rheidol falls it was clear that the river was in spate from the recent rains

A narrow-gauge steam railway winds across the steep southern side of the Rheidol valley, slowly climbing the route from Aberystwyth to Devil’s Bridge. While walking deep in the valley beside the river, I was convinced I could hear the train coming and hurried out of the trees to see it pass. The noise persisted, drifting in and out of my hearing as though the engine were rounding the rocky spurs and disappearing into wooded side valleys, yet no train appeared.

Slowly, awkwardly, I realised that the sound was that of the low set of waterfalls further up the valley, distorted and modulated by the strong east wind that was straining the still bare branches of the trees. When I reached the Rheidol falls, having taken the sloping path from just beyond the old chapel, it was clear that the river was in spate from the recent rains, with substantial volumes of water pouring over and between the rocks.

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Mike Pence warns North Korea: ‘Era of strategic patience is over’

US vice-president reiterates commitment to protect South Korea during visit the heavily armed border with the North

Mike Pence has warned that the “era of strategic patience is over” with North Korea and urged China to use its “extraordinary levers” to pressure the regime into abandoning its nuclear and ballistic missile programmes.

Speaking to reporters during a visit to the heavily armed border separating North and South Korea on Monday, the vice-president described Washington’s commitment to South Korea’s security as “unshakeable”, a day after North Korea conducted a failed missile launch.

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Malcolm Turnbull told Coalition not doing enough to avert gas crisis

Australian Industry Group says government should introduce national interest test and encourage swaps to boost supply

The federal government should do more to stop a looming gas crisis, including introducing a national interest test for exports and encouraging use of swaps to boost domestic gas supply, the Australian Industry Group has said.

In a letter sent on Thursday to Malcolm Turnbull, relevant ministers and the opposition, AiGroup warns that government efforts to boost supply while an “excellent start … may not be enough”.

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