China’s pitiless war on Muslim Uighurs poses a dilemma for the west

Europe seeks a ‘golden era’ of trade and investment with a country that is holding a million people in ‘re-education’ camps

China is facing mounting international criticism over its systematic repression of Muslim Uighurs in western Xinjiang province, where an estimated 1 million people have been detained in “re-education” camps and subjected to prolonged physical and psychological abuse.

But Chinese leaders remain defiant, telling the UN and human rights activists last week, in effect, to mind their own business. The stand-off highlights one of the most challenging 21st century dilemmas for western democracies: how to sustain the pretence that an increasingly totalitarian China is a “normal” country with which they can do business.

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UK’s smart meter revolution at risk of being short-circuited

The energy industry is struggling to meet installation targets after some embarrassing glitches

One of Britain’s biggest national infrastructure projects in decades is coming off the rails, according to a welter of criticism from politicians, consumer groups and media outlets.

The target of the carping is not the HS2 railway project or Heathrow runway expansion, but the government’s requirement for energy suppliers to offer all homes and businesses a smart meter by the end of 2020.

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US has no plan for Middle East peace, says senior Palestinian

Chief negotiator Saeb Erekat says US is trying to change terms of reference: ‘I don’t think they will ever introduce a plan’

The US will not present its long-awaited plan for Israeli-Palestinian peace any time soon and is instead trying to unilaterally change the terms of reference for any future proposal, a senior Palestinian official said on Saturday.

Related: Palestinians still live under apartheid in Israel, 25 years after the Oslo accord | Avi Shlaim

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British ex-soldier jailed in Turkey for fighting alongside banned Kurdish militia

Joe Robinson remains on bail and is planning appeal against his conviction

A former British army soldier has been jailed for nearly eight years in Turkey after he was convicted of fighting against the Islamic State terror group alongside a banned Kurdish militia.

Joe Robinson, 25, formerly of Accrington, Lancashire, was sentenced to seven years and six months’ imprisonment for belonging to the YPG, a Kurdish armed group proscribed as terrorists by Turkish law.

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Labour figures slam claim that Michael Foot was paid by Soviets

Jeremy Corbyn, Neil Kinoock and John McDonnell condemn re-emergence of claim eight years after ex-Labour leader’s death

Senior Labour figures and the family of former party leader Michael Foot have reacted with anger over the re-emergence of the explosive claim that he was a paid Soviet informant.

Neil Kinnock, who succeeded Foot as Labour leader, said his predecessor had been a “passionate and continual critic of the Soviet Union” in response to the allegation that MI6 believed Foot had been a paid informant.

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NHS mental health crisis worsens as 2,000 staff quit per month

Pledge to boost services undermined by failure to retain thousands of key workers, minister admits

Thousands of nurses, therapists and psychiatrists are quitting NHS mental health services, raising serious doubts about ministerial pledges to dramatically expand the workforce.

Two thousand mental health staff a month are leaving their posts in the NHS in England, according to figures from the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC). The news comes as services are already seriously understaffed and struggling to cope with a surge in patients seeking help for anxiety, depression and other disorders.

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NHS mental health crisis worsens as 2,000 staff quit per month

Pledge to boost services undermined by failure to retain thousands of key workers, minister admits

Thousands of nurses, therapists and psychiatrists are quitting NHS mental health services, raising serious doubts about ministerial pledges to dramatically expand the workforce.

Two thousand mental health staff a month are leaving their posts in the NHS in England, according to figures from the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC). The news comes as services are already seriously understaffed and struggling to cope with a surge in patients seeking help for anxiety, depression and other disorders.

Related: Mental health issues in young people up sixfold in England since 1995

Related: One in three freshers 'show symptoms of mental health disorder'

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Food and Brexit: will our cupboards be bare?

From farmers and poultry producers to professors of food policy, those on the frontline have been sounding the alarm. So how will the UK cope after 29 March 2019?

It is a warm day and the European Commission building, on leafy Smith Square a few streets away from the Houses of Parliament, has laid on a buffet. There will be sandwiches. There will be roasted chicken legs. Whether anybody will have an appetite for it after the event it is to follow is another matter entirely; perhaps they’ll decide to fill their pockets in an attempt to stock up for possible shortages to come. A panel of the learned, the well-read and the frankly terrified has gathered here to discuss the likely impact of Brexit on Britain’s food sector, and it is not a jolly event.

Julie Girling, Conservative MEP for south-west England and Gibraltar and a specialist in European food systems, tells us she is normally a sunny, optimistic soul. Not today. “There is very little good news coming out of Brexit,” she says, bleakly. “It’s a tragedy that we have no certainty.” Nick von Westenholz from the National Farmers Union (NFU), many of whose members voted out, takes us through various trading scenarios – customs tariffs going up, down or disappearing altogether – all of which impact the farming sector’s finances in complex ways and therefore its ability to produce more, which we may well need to do post-Brexit to keep ourselves fed.

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Catastrophic flooding feared as Florence carves deadly path across Carolinas – live updates

Five people have died in North Carolina and although the hurricane has been downgraded to a tropical storm, storm surges and strong winds could pose a danger for days

Rainfall totals in Swansboro, North Carolina have hit a record setting 30.58 inches thus far, with rain likely to continue through Tuesday.

The previous record for rainfall from a tropical system was 24.06 inches from Hurricane Floyd in 1999.

We’re there for the NC tropical cyclone rainfall record. And both mornings the rain gage was “full” at this CoCoRAHS site despite checking it more than once. pic.twitter.com/39yLGRv0vV

Looks like rain, deer.

Heard of deer swimming in flood water in Jacksonville,NC! This is real, we have video if it too on @weatherchannel !!!!! pic.twitter.com/0BsKW3w6Jn

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‘It was like a family’: remembering the Mangrove, Notting Hill’s Caribbean haven

The west London cafe, which opened 50 years ago, became a symbol of black urban resistance

A two-bedroom flat on Notting Hill’s All Saints Road can fetch up to £2m these days. But half a century ago, when property prices were a small fraction of what they are now, the road was on the frontline of battles between the police and the black community.

Notting Hill and Brixton were the two main areas where Windrush migrants settled. The majority who arrived in Notting Hill came from Trinidad, and at the very heart of this community was the Mangrove restaurant, at 8 All Saints Road.

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Off Tanzania, in one of the world’s richest seas, why is the catch getting smaller?

In Dar-es-Salaam, local fishermen are being squeezed out by illegal boats with explosives which take much of the catch, killing coral reef and putting an eco-system at risk

Fishing boat XTK191, known as Home Boy, returned to Kivukoni fish market in downtown Dar es Salaam at dawn one day last week. The 15 young men on board the old dhow dropped anchor and heaved their catch over the side for others to run it across the beach to where hundreds of traders milled.

Within an hour of landing in eastern Africa’s largest fish market, Home Boy’s fish, crabs, prawn, lobsters, tuna, squid and baby sharks were being sold in impromptu auctions, along with the catches of several dozen other boats.

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Writers’ wilderness haven split over Brecon Beacons phone mast plan

Edna O’Brien, Ian McEwan and Bruce Chatwin have treasured its wild beauty. But now plans for a 17.5-metre tower have divided a tranquil hamlet

Its monks left more than a century ago but the whitewashed stone walls of the monastery in Capel-y-ffin stand proud. Outside, a large, well-preserved statue of the Virgin Mary welcomes visitors to the venerable Victorian building, which has now been converted into self-catering apartments in great demand when the crowds flock to nearby Hay-on-Wye for its celebrated literary festival.

Since the monks’ departure, little has changed in this picturesque Welsh hamlet of a few houses, a chapel and a scattering of farms. Nestling in the foothills of the Black Mountains, it is a place of moss and bracken, stone walls and brooks, and has the lingering solemnity of an untended churchyard.

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