European countries have carried out 8% of promised refugee relocations

‘No more excuses,’ warns European commission as it emerges only Malta and Finland have met resettling obligations

European countries have accepted less than 10% of the 160,000 refugees they promised to move to safety from unsanitary and cramped camps in Italy and Greece, leading the European commission to warn it will “accept no more excuses”.

Only 13,546 relocations have been carried out so far – 3,936 from Italy and 9,610 from Greece – amounting to just 8% of the total the EU committed to relocate in 2015.

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Physical restraint in mental health units is traumatising women all over again| Katharine Sacks-Jones

One in five women and girls are subjected to this traumatic treatment, and face-down restraint is common. There is no need for this brutality

When a woman or girl is admitted to a mental health unit, her expectation should be of a caring, supportive environment where she can get the treatment she needs to get better. Unfortunately, we now know from Agenda’s latest research on restraint that many are instead in an environment where physical force has become shockingly routine.

Agenda is an alliance of more than 70 organisations campaigning on behalf of women and girls at risk. We decided to ask for data about the use of restraint because previous research we carried out on mental health trusts’ strategies and policies – as part of our Women in Mind campaign – showed that most were failing to take into account women’s specific needs.

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Physical restraint in mental health units is traumatising women all over again| Katharine Sacks-Jones

One in five women and girls are subjected to this traumatic treatment, and face-down restraint is common. There is no need for this brutality

When a woman or girl is admitted to a mental health unit, her expectation should be of a caring, supportive environment where she can get the treatment she needs to get better. Unfortunately, we now know from Agenda’s latest research on restraint that many are instead in an environment where physical force has become shockingly routine.

Agenda is an alliance of more than 70 organisations campaigning on behalf of women and girls at risk. We decided to ask for data about the use of restraint because previous research we carried out on mental health trusts’ strategies and policies – as part of our Women in Mind campaign – showed that most were failing to take into account women’s specific needs.

Being physically held down and having your clothes pulled out of place can be an extremely humiliating experience

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Asda imposes harsher terms on suppliers after pound’s Brexit slide

Struggling retailer, which owns the George brand, says clothing businesses may need to wait 90 days for payment

Asda, Britain’s third largest supermarket chain and owner of the George brand, is imposing harsher payment terms on its clothing suppliers as it attempts to turn the business around.

A letter sent on Tuesday to international suppliers warned they will now have to wait a third longer to receive payment, as it extends its terms from 60 to 90 days.

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NHS standing on outdated acute care model says CQC chief

Campaigners say CQC report highlights impact of government cuts to NHS, with rising demand putting patient care at risk

The health service “stands on a burning platform” of an outdated model of acute care that is no longer able to deliver the services needed for modern patients, according to England’s top hospital inspector.

Prof Sir Mike Richards, the Care Quality Commission’s chief inspector of hospitals, said safety remains a “real concern” in the NHS, with wide variations of quality between hospitals and even between services within the same hospitals.

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NHS standing on outdated acute care model says CQC chief

Campaigners say CQC report highlights impact of government cuts to NHS, with rising demand putting patient care at risk

The health service “stands on a burning platform” of an outdated model of acute care that is no longer able to deliver the services needed for modern patients, according to England’s top hospital inspector.

Prof Sir Mike Richards, the Care Quality Commission’s chief inspector of hospitals, said safety remains a “real concern” in the NHS, with wide variations of quality between hospitals and even between services within the same hospitals.

Related: Labour’s failure on the NHS is prolonging this health crisis | Polly Toynbee

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Bill Shorten takes town hall test: Trump, tax, refugees and the gum tree menace

The opposition leader rolls up his sleeves and takes questions on a surprisingly diverse range of topics from the audience at Canberra’s Albert Hall

The grey clouds hung low, and it drizzled. A small band of protesters shouted for refugees. Bill Shorten swept down the aisle of the Albert Hall like he was in a wedding procession – with a couple of federal police groomsmen eyeing off the guests.

Canberra is a progressive town. The moist attendees for the Labor leader’s first Canberra “town hall” meeting cheered their welcome.

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Philip Green owes us BHS workers much more than ‘up to’ £363m | Grant Atterbury

Be sceptical about this asset-stripping knight’s pension fund promise. In such cases the only numbers that count are the ones preceded with ‘at least’

In the nine months since I was made redundant after eight and half years working at BHS, much has been said about bringing those responsible to account but little has actually been done. It came as a surprise then when my Twitter feed burst into life with excited messages announcing that the disgraced former BHS owner Sir Philip Green had promised to pay £363m into the BHS pension scheme.

Related: Philip Green has shown the rich can game the system. We need to stop another BHS | Prem Sikka

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The word hysterical no longer silences women. Nice try, Chancellor | Mary Creagh

I enjoy the cut and thrust of politics. But I was disappointed to find myself the subject of Philip Hammond’s tired old sexist jibe

I asked Philip Hammond, the chancellor of the exchequer, a fairly routine Treasury question on Tuesday. Would he give policy and regulatory certainty to the 100,000 UK businesses who registered companies in Ireland after the vote to leave the EU? It obviously hit a raw nerve.

To my astonishment, he told me not to be “hysterical”. There was commotion from my Labour colleagues and, to jeering from Tory MPs, I demanded he withdrew his remarks. He apologised by deploying the weapon used by men everywhere: “I didn’t call her hysterical – I urged her not to be hysterical.” But if I warned Hammond not to be a sexist, am I not implying that he is, in fact, exactly that?

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‘It is us who will change the world’: girl guides make their voices heard

What does it mean to be a girl today? These letters shed light on the challenges facing young women across the globe, and the power of collective action

In a bid to ensure young women’s voices are heard, the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts has launched a letter-writing campaign, encouraging its 10 million members to share their hope and ambitions for a better world with girls across the globe so that together they can form a stronger collective voice about issues that affect them, such as gender equality and discrimination.

Here are excerpts from letters written by guides across the globe, who reveal the issues affecting them.

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Voting under way in Northern Ireland assembly elections

Following collapse of power-sharing executive in January, voters head to polls for second time in less than a year

Voters are going to the polls in Northern Ireland for the second time in less than a year.

Power-sharing arrangements between the two largest parties at the Stormont assembly – the Democratic Unionists and Sinn Féin – collapsed in January. If post-election talks cannot mend tensions between the former coalition partners then direct rule from London looks likely.

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Police question man over Melbourne factory fire that killed three people

Arson squad is investigating the suspicious fire that killed the three who are believed to have been squatting in the abandoned factory

A man is being questioned by police over a Melbourne factory fire which killed three people.

The arson squad is investigating the suspicious fire at an abandoned Melbourne factory, a day after new plans for the site were approved.

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