Ministers braced for new vote on customs union after Lords defeat

Former Tory ministers among peers backing amendment to EU withdrawal bill in one of largest votes ever recorded in Lords

Ministers are bracing themselves for a new vote on a customs union in the Commons in the aftermath of Wednesday night’s thumping defeat in the Lords.

An amendment to the EU withdrawal bill was carried by a majority of 123 in one of the largest votes ever recorded in the Lords. Former Conservative cabinet ministers were among the amendment’s backers. The amendment only commits the government to making a statement about the steps it has taken on a customs union.

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Trump of the tropics: the ‘dangerous’ candidate leading Brazil’s presidential race

Jair Bolsonaro has openly cheered dictatorship and publicly insulted women. Now he’s deploying Trump-like tactics in his race for the presidency

Jair Bolsonaro’s disciples had packed the arrivals hall of this far-flung Amazonian airport, united by their contempt for the left and an unbreakable determination to score a selfie with the man they call “the Myth”.

“He’s Brazil’s hope! A light at the end of the tunnel! A new horizon!” gushed Fernando Vieira, one of hundreds of fans there to greet a far-right firebrand who cheerleads for dictatorship but could soon become leader of the world’s fourth-largest democracy.

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Commonwealth summit: can Britain still shape the world post-Brexit?

International trade is firmly on the agenda as the group of 53 disparate nations meet in London

Any 80-year-old institution based on the contours of a defunct 19th century empire and largely held together by the charming drive of a 91-year-old woman is going to struggle to prove it is relevant. Described once in the New Statesman by James Fenton as “one of the world’s least obnoxious institutions”, the Commonwealth probably can probably only ever aspire to have faint praise heaped on it. For others surveying an already overcrowded schedule of diplomatic summits, this is the Zombie Summit, a biennial gathering of whimsy that refuses to die.

Not surprisingly, the task of finding a thematic rationale for a Commonwealth summit of 53 nations, the first to be held in the UK since 1997, is not simple. It was the unlucky lot of the 70-strong Cabinet Office unit planning for the summit’s welcome that a sequence of decisions taken by the UK Border Force and former home secretary Theresa May on Commonwealth citizens up to five years earlier meant that the headlines in the run-up to the summit were chiefly about rejection. The true motive of the British prime minister, it appeared, had been to a create a hostile environment for Commonwealth citizens, and to remove what they had assumed were unchallengeable rights. As PR disasters go, they rarely come much worse.

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Losing my mum to breast cancer defined my radiography career

As she went through treatment, it was clear that I wanted to specialise in breast cancer. I hope she’s proud of the person I’ve become

As my mum fought against breast cancer, I decided I wanted to spend my life seeking it out in others.

My mum was diagnosed following a routine mammogram in 2007. At that point I had started working as a diagnostic radiographer. As she went through treatment – surgery, then chemotherapy and radiotherapy, it started to become clear that I wanted to specialise in breast cancer.

Related: NHS staff helped me survive losing my seven-year-old daughter to cancer

Related: We can be heroes: the masks putting children with cancer at ease

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Losing my mum to breast cancer defined my radiography career

As she went through treatment, it was clear that I wanted to specialise in breast cancer. I hope she’s proud of the person I’ve become

As my mum fought against breast cancer, I decided I wanted to spend my life seeking it out in others.

My mum was diagnosed following a routine mammogram in 2007. At that point I had started working as a diagnostic radiographer. As she went through treatment – surgery, then chemotherapy and radiotherapy, it started to become clear that I wanted to specialise in breast cancer.

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UK could enjoy hottest April day in almost 70 years

Temperature could reach 28C in south-east England as warm and sunny weather is forecast for most parts of Britain

Parts of the UK could experience the warmest April day in almost 70 years with temperatures in the hottest spots possibly reaching 28C.

The current balmy spell is set to peak in the south-east of England on Thursday, where it is forecast to be hotter than Spain and Italy.

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Gove says Brexit has helped make UK ‘most immigration-friendly country in EU’ – Politics live

Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen

Good morning. Theresa May is attending the formal opening of the Commonwealth heads of government meeting today. But the controversy about the government’s treatment of Windrush generation immigrants continues to dominate the headlines. Here are the latest overnight developments.

This was a very contested piece of legislation across government departments ... There were some how saw it - I shan’t name them - as almost reminiscent of Nazi Germany and the way it’s working ... Some ministers were deeply unhappy.

"There were some who saw it, I shan't name them, as almost reminiscent of Nazi Germany in the way it's working" - former head of the civil service @SirBobKerslake on the hostile environment policy #newsnight pic.twitter.com/eDVGYvAw8w

Something very striking was reported by the European Union, actually, a little earlier this year, which is that of all the countries in the EU, Britain is the country with the warmest attitude to migration from outside the EU. We’re the most immigration-friendly country in the EU ...

In the aftermath of the Brexit vote, there were all sorts of people who said that it was motivated by darker feelings. The truth is that the Brexit vote allowed the British people to say ‘Look, we’ve taken back control, we can now determine what migration policy is in our interests and we can combine both what’s in our economic interests with proper humanity.’ And the really striking thing now is that Britain has the most liberal attitude towards migration of any European country. And that follows the Brexit vote.

TELEGRAPH: Boris: We must take a hard line on knife crime #tomorrowspaperstoday pic.twitter.com/NHF5foibLm

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May’s immigration policy seen as ‘almost reminiscent of Nazi Germany’

Comments from ex-civil service chief Sir Bob Kerslake increase pressure on PM as row over Windrush-era citizens continues

The hostile immigration environment Theresa May set out to create when she was at the Home Office was regarded by some ministers as “almost reminiscent of Nazi Germany” in the way it is working, the former head of the civil service, Lord Kerslake, has said.

Who are the Windrush generation?

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Westpac advice cost couple dream retirement, banking royal commission hears

Bank admits advice was poor after customer reveals she and her husband were ‘led up the garden path’ and ended up losing their home
• A recent history of Australia’s banking scandals

Westpac admits a senior financial planner gave poor advice to a couple that cost them their dream retirement.

Jacqueline McDowall and her husband ended up losing their home after trying to use superannuation funds to buy a bed and breakfast.

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