Uganda’s sprawling haven for 270,000 of South Sudan’s refugees

Bidi Bidi camp was opened six months ago but already hosts a fifth of all the South Sudanese fleeing violence and hunger in their home country

Moses Roba still has the scar on his face from when the glass shattered. It runs around the outside of his right eye, starting at the tip of his eyebrow and curving down to the top of his cheekbone. He got it, he says, when rebels opposed to South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir attacked his car near his home in the small border town of Nimule. The rebels wanted to steal the vehicle, he claims. But he said no.

“I refused, so they shoot me, they shoot the vehicle,” he says. A piece of glass sliced through the side of his face, missing his eye by a centimetre. His car was torched.
After that, Roba decided to leave his home country and, along with his wife and three children, made the short but perilous journey south into Uganda.

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Bidi Bidi camp was opened six months ago but already hosts a fifth of all the South Sudanese fleeing violence and hunger in their home country

Moses Roba still has the scar on his face from when the glass shattered. It runs around the outside of his right eye, starting at the tip of his eyebrow and curving down to the top of his cheekbone. He got it, he says, when rebels opposed to South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir attacked his car near his home in the small border town of Nimule. The rebels wanted to steal the vehicle, he claims. But he said no.

“I refused, so they shoot me, they shoot the vehicle,” he says. A piece of glass sliced through the side of his face, missing his eye by a centimetre. His car was torched.
After that, Roba decided to leave his home country and, along with his wife and three children, made the short but perilous journey south into Uganda.

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‘How will we survive?’: Syrian refugees trapped in poverty in Thailand

The status of refugees is not recognised in Thailand, leaving the few hundred Syrians there unable to work or go to school, at constant risk of deportation

After prayers, Nassr, 58, lights one of the 60 cigarettes he will smoke that day. “It’s the stress,” he shrugs apologetically. “The tension of being an illegal refugee in Thailand.”

As the minaret’s call fades, the noise from Bangkok’s khlong boats intensifies as they carry commuters along the waterways. Together with two Iraqi friends Nassr, a Palestinian Syrian, watches the bustle, wishing he could get a job.

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The status of refugees is not recognised in Thailand, leaving the few hundred Syrians there unable to work or go to school, at constant risk of deportation

After prayers, Nassr, 58, lights one of the 60 cigarettes he will smoke that day. “It’s the stress,” he shrugs apologetically. “The tension of being an illegal refugee in Thailand.”

As the minaret’s call fades, the noise from Bangkok’s khlong boats intensifies as they carry commuters along the waterways. Together with two Iraqi friends Nassr, a Palestinian Syrian, watches the bustle, wishing he could get a job.

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Dutch respond to Trump’s ‘gag rule’ with international safe abortion fund

  • Up to 20 countries indicate support for fund to plug $600m funding gap
  • Netherlands minister: ‘It’s important to stand your ground’

Up to 20 countries have indicated support for the Netherlands’ plan to set up an international safe abortion fund to plug a $600m funding gap caused by Donald Trump’s reinstatement of the “global gag rule”, the Dutch international development minister, Lilianne Ploumen, said on Wednesday.

Ploumen took soundings from a number of her colleagues around the world on Tuesday evening after the Netherlands said it would act to mitigate the impact on hundreds of charities around the world.

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  • Up to 20 countries indicate support for fund to plug $600m funding gap
  • Netherlands minister: ‘It’s important to stand your ground’

Up to 20 countries have indicated support for the Netherlands’ plan to set up an international safe abortion fund to plug a $600m funding gap caused by Donald Trump’s reinstatement of the “global gag rule”, the Dutch international development minister, Lilianne Ploumen, said on Wednesday.

Ploumen took soundings from a number of her colleagues around the world on Tuesday evening after the Netherlands said it would act to mitigate the impact on hundreds of charities around the world.

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‘Global gag rule’ on abortion puts $9bn in health aid at risk, activists say

Donald Trump’s executive order prompts fears for groups fighting Aids and Zika and working against child and maternal deaths

Billions of dollars in US aid to groups combating diseases worldwide could be at risk from Donald’s Trump’s “unprecedented and far-reaching” reversal of abortion-related policy, campaigners warned on Tuesday.

Trump signed an executive order on Monday reinstating the “global gag rule”, which bans funding for groups that offer abortions or abortion advocacy, even if they use their own funds to do so.

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Donald Trump’s executive order prompts fears for groups fighting Aids and Zika and working against child and maternal deaths

Billions of dollars in US aid to groups combating diseases worldwide could be at risk from Donald’s Trump’s “unprecedented and far-reaching” reversal of abortion-related policy, campaigners warned on Tuesday.

Trump signed an executive order on Monday reinstating the “global gag rule”, which bans funding for groups that offer abortions or abortion advocacy, even if they use their own funds to do so.

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‘I want to kill these dogs’: question of whether to cull strays divides Yangon

Myanmar’s commercial capital is overrun with an estimated 120,000 stray dogs, which attack children and carry the threat of rabies. Mass culling was recently stopped but spay, neuter and vaccinate programmes have yet to start

Zu May Naing was playing with her brother outside their house in Bago Region, close to Myanmar’s commercial capital of Yangon, last month when a pack of stray dogs rounded on the 18-month-old.

Her mother, San Thar Myint, found her lying prone on the ground, bleeding and in shock. “Her temperature was over 100 [degrees fahrenheit] before they got to the operation room,” she says.

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Myanmar’s commercial capital is overrun with an estimated 120,000 stray dogs, which attack children and carry the threat of rabies. Mass culling was recently stopped but spay, neuter and vaccinate programmes have yet to start

Zu May Naing was playing with her brother outside their house in Bago Region, close to Myanmar’s commercial capital of Yangon, last month when a pack of stray dogs rounded on the 18-month-old.

Her mother, San Thar Myint, found her lying prone on the ground, bleeding and in shock. “Her temperature was over 100 [degrees fahrenheit] before they got to the operation room,” she says.

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Will New York get a Brexit boost to cancel out feared ‘Trump slump’?

While European cities led by Paris and Frankfurt wage campaigns for London’s financial business, some experts predict New York could benefit most of all from the fallout of Brexit on the UK capital

New York and London function as two prongs of one global economy. Banks and other financial companies headquartered in New York usually have their second biggest offices in the British capital, and vice versa.

For years, that’s made economic sense. For London-based companies, New York provides an unparalleled density of financial firms, a regulatory framework in which to do business, and access to non-European markets. London provides much of the same for New York-based companies who need access to European markets.

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While European cities led by Paris and Frankfurt wage campaigns for London’s financial business, some experts predict New York could benefit most of all from the fallout of Brexit on the UK capital

New York and London function as two prongs of one global economy. Banks and other financial companies headquartered in New York usually have their second biggest offices in the British capital, and vice versa.

For years, that’s made economic sense. For London-based companies, New York provides an unparalleled density of financial firms, a regulatory framework in which to do business, and access to non-European markets. London provides much of the same for New York-based companies who need access to European markets.

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The future of the US-Mexican border: inside the ‘split city’ of El Paso-Juárez

One has been called the world’s most violent city. The other, the safest in its nation. Schoolchildren commute daily between the ‘binational’ cities of Juárez, Mexico and El Paso, Texas – but with Trump in office, will border divisions grow?

Unlike most teenagers, Ashley Delgado starts her school day by crossing an international border. She gets up at 5am so her mother Dora can drive through Juárez’s dense traffic to the Paso del Norte bridge, where she follows the caged pathway between Mexico and the United States by foot. Clearing customs takes on average half an hour, but often it’s double that – depending on the line and the guards’ moods.

“Sometimes they put people in a little room for investigation and start to ask questions,” says the 14-year-old as her mum picks her up from the Mexican side at the end of a school day. “Where are you from? What are you bringing? What are you going to do in the US? It’s never happened to me, but to some of my friends it happens every three days.

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One has been called the world’s most violent city. The other, the safest in its nation. Schoolchildren commute daily between the ‘binational’ cities of Juárez, Mexico and El Paso, Texas – but with Trump in office, will border divisions grow?

Unlike most teenagers, Ashley Delgado starts her school day by crossing an international border. She gets up at 5am so her mother Dora can drive through Juárez’s dense traffic to the Paso del Norte bridge, where she follows the caged pathway between Mexico and the United States by foot. Clearing customs takes on average half an hour, but often it’s double that – depending on the line and the guards’ moods.

“Sometimes they put people in a little room for investigation and start to ask questions,” says the 14-year-old as her mum picks her up from the Mexican side at the end of a school day. “Where are you from? What are you bringing? What are you going to do in the US? It’s never happened to me, but to some of my friends it happens every three days.

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The worst forest fire in Chile’s history – in pictures

Chile is facing the worst forest fires it has ever seen, with more than 600 sq miles of land destroyed and thousands of people evacuated from their homes. The Chilean government has declared a state of emergency in several areas, as people try to save their homes, livestock and land

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Chile is facing the worst forest fires it has ever seen, with more than 600 sq miles of land destroyed and thousands of people evacuated from their homes. The Chilean government has declared a state of emergency in several areas, as people try to save their homes, livestock and land

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The weakening of the ‘alt-right’: how infighting and doxxing are taking a toll

As the far right movement has emerged from obscurity, it has also become a target, facing what Richard Spencer calls ‘a literal and figurative punch in the face’

The on-camera punching of Richard Spencer in DC last weekend launched a thousand memes. It also crystallized a moment of difficulty for the far-right movement whose name Spencer coined – the “alt-right”.

“It was a literal and figurative punch in the face,” Spencer told the Guardian in a telephone conversation, adding that it would change his approach to public appearances. “I didn’t think of myself as someone who needs bodyguards, but I clearly do. Particularly at events – an inauguration or an election. I just can’t do these things alone any more. It wasn’t like that six months ago, and it certainly wasn’t like that five years ago.”

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As the far right movement has emerged from obscurity, it has also become a target, facing what Richard Spencer calls ‘a literal and figurative punch in the face’

The on-camera punching of Richard Spencer in DC last weekend launched a thousand memes. It also crystallized a moment of difficulty for the far-right movement whose name Spencer coined – the “alt-right”.

“It was a literal and figurative punch in the face,” Spencer told the Guardian in a telephone conversation, adding that it would change his approach to public appearances. “I didn’t think of myself as someone who needs bodyguards, but I clearly do. Particularly at events – an inauguration or an election. I just can’t do these things alone any more. It wasn’t like that six months ago, and it certainly wasn’t like that five years ago.”

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Protest v parenthood: how the children of political activists suffer in silence

The ascendance of Trump has renewed political resistance. But many children of past activists say their parent’s choices made them feel secondary to the cause

As a little girl, Rachel Fast’s parents took her to a Christmas party in the basement of the famous married couple, WEB Du Bois and Shirley Graham, both writers and activists. A giant Christmas tree stood in the corner, music tinkled happily, and the adults milled around drinking. But Fast, the daughter of prominent novelist and then communist activist Howard Fast, was not amused: the children of the Rosenbergs were at the party. Their parents were in prison awaiting execution. “It was imminent,” Fast remembers.

Rachel Fast’s parents had been involved in trying to save the Rosenbergs, who were convicted of espionage, from execution. But the demonstrations, meetings and letter-writing had all failed.

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The ascendance of Trump has renewed political resistance. But many children of past activists say their parent’s choices made them feel secondary to the cause

As a little girl, Rachel Fast’s parents took her to a Christmas party in the basement of the famous married couple, WEB Du Bois and Shirley Graham, both writers and activists. A giant Christmas tree stood in the corner, music tinkled happily, and the adults milled around drinking. But Fast, the daughter of prominent novelist and then communist activist Howard Fast, was not amused: the children of the Rosenbergs were at the party. Their parents were in prison awaiting execution. “It was imminent,” Fast remembers.

Rachel Fast’s parents had been involved in trying to save the Rosenbergs, who were convicted of espionage, from execution. But the demonstrations, meetings and letter-writing had all failed.

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Mexican president ‘demands respect’ and rejects US border wall – video

President Enrique Peña Nieto says he rejects the decision by the US president, Donald Trump, to build a border wall and repeats that his country will not pay for its construction. In a recorded address televised nationally, Mexico’s leader says: ‘I am saddened and am against the decision by the United States to continue with the construction of a wall.’ He adds: ‘Mexico offers and demands respect’

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President Enrique Peña Nieto says he rejects the decision by the US president, Donald Trump, to build a border wall and repeats that his country will not pay for its construction. In a recorded address televised nationally, Mexico’s leader says: ‘I am saddened and am against the decision by the United States to continue with the construction of a wall.’ He adds: ‘Mexico offers and demands respect’

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Theresa May accused of ‘grovelling’ after praising Trump for renewing America – Politics live

Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen

11.04am GMT

While David Davis was taking questions in the Commons, Boris Johnson, the foreign secretary, was giving evidence to a Lords committee. Here are the key points so far, with tweets from the Guardian’s Patrick Wintour, the Mail’s Matt Dathan, the Telegraph’s Steven Swinford and PoliticsHome’s Emilio Casalicchio.

Boris Johnson says Donald Trump has made no new official pronouncements or policy, but UK position on torture is unchanged.

Asked about Trump’s support for torture, Boris says ‘we have to be v careful with this’ as we’ve not seen ‘any policy changes/pronouncements pic.twitter.com/LpuWMc0Ds9

Boris Johnson “The PM in Commons was very clear that our principled position and objection to torture is unchanged”.

Boris Johnson says that Donald Trump has put Britain ‘at the front of the line’ for a trade deal. Says he is ‘very hopeful’ for relationship

Johnson dodges question on Trump’s plan to ban refugees, but says warnings of reprisals deserves to be heard loud and clear in White House.

Boris Johnson says UK no longer in a “long slow glissando of post-war decline, introversion and shrinking horizons”.

Johnson on Syria calls for election or plebiscite in which 11m IDPs are fully entitled to vote. “We believe in democracy”.

Johnson says after a Syrian, probably federal, peace settlement he can imagine that UK would want to be involved as peacekeepers.

Boris Johnson remarkably softer on Russia since Syria peace talks. “We cannot constantly push them away and demonise them”. At Lords Cttee.

10.33am GMT

Nigel Huddleston, a Conservative, asks if the government will be seeking visa-free travel between the UK and the EU after Brexit.

David Jones says the government hopes to put in place “frictionless” arrangements.

Continue reading…

Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen

11.04am GMT

While David Davis was taking questions in the Commons, Boris Johnson, the foreign secretary, was giving evidence to a Lords committee. Here are the key points so far, with tweets from the Guardian’s Patrick Wintour, the Mail’s Matt Dathan, the Telegraph’s Steven Swinford and PoliticsHome’s Emilio Casalicchio.

Boris Johnson says Donald Trump has made no new official pronouncements or policy, but UK position on torture is unchanged.

Asked about Trump’s support for torture, Boris says ‘we have to be v careful with this’ as we’ve not seen ‘any policy changes/pronouncements pic.twitter.com/LpuWMc0Ds9

Boris Johnson “The PM in Commons was very clear that our principled position and objection to torture is unchanged”.

Boris Johnson says that Donald Trump has put Britain ‘at the front of the line’ for a trade deal. Says he is ‘very hopeful’ for relationship

Johnson dodges question on Trump’s plan to ban refugees, but says warnings of reprisals deserves to be heard loud and clear in White House.

Boris Johnson says UK no longer in a “long slow glissando of post-war decline, introversion and shrinking horizons”.

Johnson on Syria calls for election or plebiscite in which 11m IDPs are fully entitled to vote. “We believe in democracy”.

Johnson says after a Syrian, probably federal, peace settlement he can imagine that UK would want to be involved as peacekeepers.

Boris Johnson remarkably softer on Russia since Syria peace talks. “We cannot constantly push them away and demonise them”. At Lords Cttee.

10.33am GMT

Nigel Huddleston, a Conservative, asks if the government will be seeking visa-free travel between the UK and the EU after Brexit.

David Jones says the government hopes to put in place “frictionless” arrangements.

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The UK must not stand by while crimes against humanity are committed | Alison McGovern

Our report, begun by the murdered MP Jo Cox, argues that acting to prevent mass atrocities is an essential part of Britain’s role in the world

There have been some flickers of hope from Syrian peace talks taking place in Astana this week. The negotiations led by Russia, Iran and Turkey may yet pave the way to a sustainable ceasefire deal, but even this will not erase the fact that the international community’s record on Syria is a bloody and shameful one.

Nearly six years after peaceful protesters took to the streets of Damascus, more than 300,000 people have been killed and millions displaced by a war that has seen international norms violated, chemical weapons deployed against civilians, and the barbaric tactics of siege and starvation used by a state against its own citizens.

Continue reading…Our report, begun by the murdered MP Jo Cox, argues that acting to prevent mass atrocities is an essential part of Britain’s role in the world

There have been some flickers of hope from Syrian peace talks taking place in Astana this week. The negotiations led by Russia, Iran and Turkey may yet pave the way to a sustainable ceasefire deal, but even this will not erase the fact that the international community’s record on Syria is a bloody and shameful one.

Nearly six years after peaceful protesters took to the streets of Damascus, more than 300,000 people have been killed and millions displaced by a war that has seen international norms violated, chemical weapons deployed against civilians, and the barbaric tactics of siege and starvation used by a state against its own citizens.

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Government agency ‘gag orders’: what we know and what we don’t

Trump administration comments were at odds with reports that EPA employees were banned from tweeting, issuing press releases or speaking with reporters

White House press secretary Sean Spicer on Wednesday added a layer of confusion to reports that the Trump administration directed a communications crackdown on a handful of federal agencies.

“That’s nothing that’s coming from the White House,” Spicer told the press during his daily briefing. “They haven’t been directed by us to do anything.”

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Trump administration comments were at odds with reports that EPA employees were banned from tweeting, issuing press releases or speaking with reporters

White House press secretary Sean Spicer on Wednesday added a layer of confusion to reports that the Trump administration directed a communications crackdown on a handful of federal agencies.

“That’s nothing that’s coming from the White House,” Spicer told the press during his daily briefing. “They haven’t been directed by us to do anything.”

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Will Trump return USA to dark days of ‘war on terror’ black sites?

President appears to believe ‘torture works’ – raising prospect of reviving techniques the CIA had moved away from

One of the common features of the multiple conflicts that followed the 9/11 attacks on the US was the use of secret prisons. Islamic extremists used them – most notably Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the leader of al-Qaida in Iraq – and so did a range of states in the Middle East, south Asia and beyond. Many had been doing so for many years.

But one of the most enthusiastic users of secret prisons – and torture – in the years following 9/11 was the USA. Its sites eventually numbered more than 100, it is believed, spanning half the world. It is this network of “black sites” that Donald Trump appears to be considering reviving.

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President appears to believe ‘torture works’ – raising prospect of reviving techniques the CIA had moved away from

One of the common features of the multiple conflicts that followed the 9/11 attacks on the US was the use of secret prisons. Islamic extremists used them – most notably Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the leader of al-Qaida in Iraq – and so did a range of states in the Middle East, south Asia and beyond. Many had been doing so for many years.

But one of the most enthusiastic users of secret prisons – and torture – in the years following 9/11 was the USA. Its sites eventually numbered more than 100, it is believed, spanning half the world. It is this network of “black sites” that Donald Trump appears to be considering reviving.

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Rory McGrath pleads guilty to stalking

Comedian denied charge at previous hearing but changed plea on first day on trial in Huntington

The comedian Rory McGrath has admitted stalking a married woman for 14 months.

He had denied the single charge at an earlier hearing but changed his plea to guilty on the first day of his trial at Huntingdon magistrates court in Cambridgeshire on Thursday.

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Comedian denied charge at previous hearing but changed plea on first day on trial in Huntington

The comedian Rory McGrath has admitted stalking a married woman for 14 months.

He had denied the single charge at an earlier hearing but changed his plea to guilty on the first day of his trial at Huntingdon magistrates court in Cambridgeshire on Thursday.

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Romania’s corruption fight is a smokescreen to weaken its democracy

Turning a blind eye to this abuse of power risks encouraging other European nations to follow its example

The recent rise of the populist right in Hungary and Poland has raised the alarm about the future of democracy in Europe, as constitutional safeguards, media pluralism and civil society come under sustained attack.

But there is another threat hiding in plain sight: the abuse of anti-corruption laws in Romania, a country often lauded as an example of successful reform in central and eastern Europe.

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Turning a blind eye to this abuse of power risks encouraging other European nations to follow its example

The recent rise of the populist right in Hungary and Poland has raised the alarm about the future of democracy in Europe, as constitutional safeguards, media pluralism and civil society come under sustained attack.

But there is another threat hiding in plain sight: the abuse of anti-corruption laws in Romania, a country often lauded as an example of successful reform in central and eastern Europe.

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‘My neighbour murdered nearly all of my family, but now we are friends’

Thanks to a pioneering reconciliation project survivors and perpetrators of the Rwandan genocide now live side by side

In a leafy, quiet district less than an hour’s drive from Rwanda’s capital, the calmness of the community of Mbyo belies the dark and traumatic past of its inhabitants.

Related: My journey back to Rwanda: confronting the ghosts of the genocide 21 years later

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Thanks to a pioneering reconciliation project survivors and perpetrators of the Rwandan genocide now live side by side

In a leafy, quiet district less than an hour’s drive from Rwanda’s capital, the calmness of the community of Mbyo belies the dark and traumatic past of its inhabitants.

Related: My journey back to Rwanda: confronting the ghosts of the genocide 21 years later

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May and Trump talks likely to reveal cracks in ‘special relationship’

British PM could struggle to negotiate good trade deal with president who has pledged to put America first

Appetite for a US trade deal with Britain appears as high in Washington as it is in London, according to interviews with politicians, with both governments anxious to demonstrate there is more to economic populism than simply a desire for protectionism.

But despite the political convergence indicated by Donald Trump’s election and the Brexit vote, Theresa May will discover the special relationship still has plenty of cracks and contradictions when she visits the White House on Friday.

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British PM could struggle to negotiate good trade deal with president who has pledged to put America first

Appetite for a US trade deal with Britain appears as high in Washington as it is in London, according to interviews with politicians, with both governments anxious to demonstrate there is more to economic populism than simply a desire for protectionism.

But despite the political convergence indicated by Donald Trump’s election and the Brexit vote, Theresa May will discover the special relationship still has plenty of cracks and contradictions when she visits the White House on Friday.

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Ebola, war … but just two psychiatrists to deal with a nation’s trauma

Overwhelmed counsellors and medical staff in Sierra Leone must contend with suspicion and a collapse in funding

The history of Africa’s oldest psychiatric hospital is written on the walls of its isolation units, desperate messages chiselled into the woodwork like scars. “I came here for I don’t have any money,” reads one note in a corner of the room. “People want me to run from my father’s house,” reads another. “You go nowhere,” announces a third. “Stay out.”

Since the hospital opened in the early 19th century, most Sierra Leoneans have aspired to do exactly that, avoiding this imposing building perched high on a hill above the capital, Freetown.

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Overwhelmed counsellors and medical staff in Sierra Leone must contend with suspicion and a collapse in funding

The history of Africa’s oldest psychiatric hospital is written on the walls of its isolation units, desperate messages chiselled into the woodwork like scars. “I came here for I don’t have any money,” reads one note in a corner of the room. “People want me to run from my father’s house,” reads another. “You go nowhere,” announces a third. “Stay out.”

Since the hospital opened in the early 19th century, most Sierra Leoneans have aspired to do exactly that, avoiding this imposing building perched high on a hill above the capital, Freetown.

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US defence chief heads to Japan and South Korea to strengthen ties

Visit by James Mattis comes despite suggestions by Donald Trump that he could cut US military presence in region

The new US secretary of defence James Mattis is to reassure Japan and South Korea of Washington’s commitment to the security of the volatile Asia-Pacific region, despite suggestions by Donald Trump that he was ready to scale down the US’s military presence there.

Mattis, a retired Marine general, will reaffirm America’s role in strengthening security ties with its two strongest allies in the region when he visits South Korea on Tuesday and Japan the following day.

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Visit by James Mattis comes despite suggestions by Donald Trump that he could cut US military presence in region

The new US secretary of defence James Mattis is to reassure Japan and South Korea of Washington’s commitment to the security of the volatile Asia-Pacific region, despite suggestions by Donald Trump that he was ready to scale down the US’s military presence there.

Mattis, a retired Marine general, will reaffirm America’s role in strengthening security ties with its two strongest allies in the region when he visits South Korea on Tuesday and Japan the following day.

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‘Global gag rule’ could have dire impact in Latin America, activists warn

Reinstatement of policy by Donald Trump could have ‘chilling impact’ in region that already has high rates of teenage pregnancy and maternal mortality

Donald Trump’s reversal of abortion-related aid policy will have a “chilling impact” on Latin America, say family-planning campaigners in a region that already has some of the world’s highest rates of teenage pregnancy and maternal mortality.

The so-called global gag rule, which was signed into effect by the new US president on Monday, withholds USAid funding from any organisation that offers abortion services or information.

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Reinstatement of policy by Donald Trump could have ‘chilling impact’ in region that already has high rates of teenage pregnancy and maternal mortality

Donald Trump’s reversal of abortion-related aid policy will have a “chilling impact” on Latin America, say family-planning campaigners in a region that already has some of the world’s highest rates of teenage pregnancy and maternal mortality.

The so-called global gag rule, which was signed into effect by the new US president on Monday, withholds USAid funding from any organisation that offers abortion services or information.

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Backed up: New Zealand’s public toilets not coping with tourist influx

Friction between ‘freedom campers’ and local people as visitor numbers surge and infrastructure can’t keep up

New Zealand’s booming tourism industry is creating a nationwide shortage of toilets with locals and tourists clashing over access to lavatories

More than 3.4 million tourists visited New Zealand in 2016, marking a new record for the small island nation of 4.5 million people.

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Friction between ‘freedom campers’ and local people as visitor numbers surge and infrastructure can’t keep up

New Zealand’s booming tourism industry is creating a nationwide shortage of toilets with locals and tourists clashing over access to lavatories

More than 3.4 million tourists visited New Zealand in 2016, marking a new record for the small island nation of 4.5 million people.

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UK intelligence services face dilemma after Trump backs torture

GCHQ, MI6 and MI5 rely heavily on the US, but using intelligence obtained by torture risks breaching international law

Donald Trump’s comment that he believes torture “absolutely works” would present the UK intelligence services, who work closely with US counterparts, with a major dilemma if the US were to resume such interrogation methods.

The bulk of the intelligence being assessed by the UK agencies – especially GCHQ but also the overseas agency MI6 and, to a lesser extent, M15 – comes from the US. None of them would want to contemplate loss of that access, yet if the intelligence had been obtained through torture it would put them in breach of international law.

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GCHQ, MI6 and MI5 rely heavily on the US, but using intelligence obtained by torture risks breaching international law

Donald Trump’s comment that he believes torture “absolutely works” would present the UK intelligence services, who work closely with US counterparts, with a major dilemma if the US were to resume such interrogation methods.

The bulk of the intelligence being assessed by the UK agencies – especially GCHQ but also the overseas agency MI6 and, to a lesser extent, M15 – comes from the US. None of them would want to contemplate loss of that access, yet if the intelligence had been obtained through torture it would put them in breach of international law.

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Raúl Castro: Cuba won’t compromise sovereignty to normalize US relations

President said Cuba hopes to continue to repair relations but made it clear that Trump administration should not expect concessions affecting independence

Raúl Castro has said Cuba hopes to continue to normalize relations with the United States but made it clear that the Trump administration should not expect concessions affecting the country’s sovereignty.

Before taking office, Donald Trump threatened to torpedo the still fragile detente between the former cold war foes unless a “better deal” could be struck, without providing details. His aides have said current policy is under review.

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President said Cuba hopes to continue to repair relations but made it clear that Trump administration should not expect concessions affecting independence

Raúl Castro has said Cuba hopes to continue to normalize relations with the United States but made it clear that the Trump administration should not expect concessions affecting the country’s sovereignty.

Before taking office, Donald Trump threatened to torpedo the still fragile detente between the former cold war foes unless a “better deal” could be struck, without providing details. His aides have said current policy is under review.

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‘Do I regret it? Not for a second’: Swedish journalist goes on trial for helping refugees

Fredrik Önnevall is in court this week facing charges of people smuggling after helping 15-year-old Abed travel to Sweden

The suggestion sounded like an innocent joke, but it turned out to be deadly serious.

“Take me with you!” Abed asked Fredrik Önnevall.

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Fredrik Önnevall is in court this week facing charges of people smuggling after helping 15-year-old Abed travel to Sweden

The suggestion sounded like an innocent joke, but it turned out to be deadly serious.

“Take me with you!” Abed asked Fredrik Önnevall.

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Doctors save Canadian woman’s life by removing her lungs for six days

Melissa Benoit’s terminal lung infection called for risky and unprecedented procedure while she waited for double transplant at Toronto hospital

In what is believed to be the first procedure of its kind in the world, doctors in Canada have saved a young mother’s life by resorting to a radical solution – they removed her lungs for six days while she waited for a transplant.

In April, Melissa Benoit arrived at a Toronto hospital with a severe lung infection. Doctors soon realised that Benoit, who had been born with cystic fibrosis, had just hours to live, leading them to consider the unprecedented approach.

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Melissa Benoit’s terminal lung infection called for risky and unprecedented procedure while she waited for double transplant at Toronto hospital

In what is believed to be the first procedure of its kind in the world, doctors in Canada have saved a young mother’s life by resorting to a radical solution – they removed her lungs for six days while she waited for a transplant.

In April, Melissa Benoit arrived at a Toronto hospital with a severe lung infection. Doctors soon realised that Benoit, who had been born with cystic fibrosis, had just hours to live, leading them to consider the unprecedented approach.

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Chile battles devastating wildfires: ‘We have never seen anything on this scale’

The world’s largest firefighting aircraft has flown in from the US, alongside help from France, Peru and Mexico, as fires continue to ravage Chilean lands

The world’s biggest aerial firefighting aircraft has joined beleaguered firefighters in Chile as they battle the worst wildfires in the country’s recent history, which have devastated swaths of land.

More than 90 blazes have scorched 180,000 hectares, razed hundreds of homes, turned village schools to ashes and destroyed cattle herds and vineyards.

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The world’s largest firefighting aircraft has flown in from the US, alongside help from France, Peru and Mexico, as fires continue to ravage Chilean lands

The world’s biggest aerial firefighting aircraft has joined beleaguered firefighters in Chile as they battle the worst wildfires in the country’s recent history, which have devastated swaths of land.

More than 90 blazes have scorched 180,000 hectares, razed hundreds of homes, turned village schools to ashes and destroyed cattle herds and vineyards.

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May’s meeting with Trump: a collision of contrasting world views

The PM’s visit could be seen as a diplomatic coup, but her vision of a free-trading Britain could crash into ‘America First’

Theresa May travels to the US on Thursday to try to forge a personal and political relationship with the least predictable and, in European terms, most unpopular US president in modern times.

For all the British diplomatic pleasure that their prime minister is once again the first foreign leader through the door of a newly elected president, as John Major managed in the case of Bill Clinton in 1993, there will be wariness in Downing Street. For the first time since the second world war, the US appears to have a president who displays indifference to supporting his allies or shoring up an alliance framework.

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The PM’s visit could be seen as a diplomatic coup, but her vision of a free-trading Britain could crash into ‘America First’

Theresa May travels to the US on Thursday to try to forge a personal and political relationship with the least predictable and, in European terms, most unpopular US president in modern times.

For all the British diplomatic pleasure that their prime minister is once again the first foreign leader through the door of a newly elected president, as John Major managed in the case of Bill Clinton in 1993, there will be wariness in Downing Street. For the first time since the second world war, the US appears to have a president who displays indifference to supporting his allies or shoring up an alliance framework.

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Donald Trump says torture ‘absolutely’ works: ‘we have to fight fire with fire’

Trump gives first presidential TV interview as draft executive order points to return to practices such as waterboarding

Donald Trump has used his first TV interview as president to say he believes torture “absolutely” works and that the US should “fight fire with fire.”

Speaking to ABC News, Trump said he would defer to the defence secretary, James Mattis, and CIA director, Mike Pompeo, to determine what can and cannot be done legally to combat the spread of terrorism.

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Trump gives first presidential TV interview as draft executive order points to return to practices such as waterboarding

Donald Trump has used his first TV interview as president to say he believes torture “absolutely” works and that the US should “fight fire with fire.”

Speaking to ABC News, Trump said he would defer to the defence secretary, James Mattis, and CIA director, Mike Pompeo, to determine what can and cannot be done legally to combat the spread of terrorism.

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Mexico’s president ‘will not pay for any wall’ – but may still visit Trump

Enrique Peña Nieto repeats his refusal to fund border wall but leaves open the question of contentious 31 January trip to meet new US president

Mexico’s president has once again declared that “Mexico will not pay for any wall” but stopped short of cancelling a visit to Washington after Donald Trump signed executive orders that include building the border barrier.

Enrique Peña Nieto reiterated that Mexico would not put a single peso towards the new US president’s signature project. In a televised address he said: “I regret and reject the decision of the US to build the wall.”

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Enrique Peña Nieto repeats his refusal to fund border wall but leaves open the question of contentious 31 January trip to meet new US president

Mexico’s president has once again declared that “Mexico will not pay for any wall” but stopped short of cancelling a visit to Washington after Donald Trump signed executive orders that include building the border barrier.

Enrique Peña Nieto reiterated that Mexico would not put a single peso towards the new US president’s signature project. In a televised address he said: “I regret and reject the decision of the US to build the wall.”

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Russia says British military staging ‘show’ with Channel escort

MOSCOW (Reuters) – Russia on Thursday said the British government was staging a show by escorting a Russian aircraft carrier through the English Channel designed to distract attention away from the shortcomings of the British navy.

MOSCOW (Reuters) – Russia on Thursday said the British government was staging a show by escorting a Russian aircraft carrier through the English Channel designed to distract attention away from the shortcomings of the British navy.


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EU could fall apart if populists win Dutch, French elections – Germany’s Gabriel

BERLIN (Reuters) – German Economy Minister Sigmar Gabriel warned on Thursday that the European Union could fall apart if populists in France or the Netherlands win in elections this year.

BERLIN (Reuters) – German Economy Minister Sigmar Gabriel warned on Thursday that the European Union could fall apart if populists in France or the Netherlands win in elections this year.


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German SPD’s new leader Schulz level with Merkel in poll

BERLIN (Reuters) – As many Germans would vote for new Social Democrat (SPD) leader Martin Schulz as for conservative Angela Merkel in a direct vote for chancellor, a poll published late on Wednesday showed, eight months before federal elections in September.

BERLIN (Reuters) – As many Germans would vote for new Social Democrat (SPD) leader Martin Schulz as for conservative Angela Merkel in a direct vote for chancellor, a poll published late on Wednesday showed, eight months before federal elections in September.


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Bolt’s precious ‘treble-treble’ is no more

When Usain Bolt helped the Jamaican sprint relay team to gold in the Beijing Bird’s Nest in 2008 it felt like he was signing off with a joyful exclamation mark at the end of a miraculous new chapter in sporting history.When Usain Bolt helped the Jamaican sprint relay team to gold in the Beijing Bird’s Nest in 2008 it felt like he was signing off with a joyful exclamation mark at the end of a miraculous new chapter in sporting history.

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