Brexit: government will introduce article 50 bill ‘within days’ following supreme court ruling – as it happened

Rolling coverage of the supreme court Brexit article 50 judgment, with reaction and analysis

5.31pm GMT

Source confirms govt plan is to introduce bill this Thursday, with plan to clear all three stages in Commons within a fortnight

5.18pm GMT

The Guido Fawkes blog has a useful table listing MPs from different parties who have indicated that they will vote against triggering article 50.

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Rolling coverage of the supreme court Brexit article 50 judgment, with reaction and analysis

5.31pm GMT

Source confirms govt plan is to introduce bill this Thursday, with plan to clear all three stages in Commons within a fortnight

5.18pm GMT

The Guido Fawkes blog has a useful table listing MPs from different parties who have indicated that they will vote against triggering article 50.

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Corbyn’s white paper panic at PMQs gives May a Brexit breather

The PM discombobulated the Labour leader with her announcement but was on shakier ground about her Trump date

Some blinked. Some gasped. Cognitive dissonance takes on many forms. Conservative Chris Philp is best known in the Commons for never letting any bum go unkissed and certainly not as a man to put a point of principle before his career, yet here he was sounding every bit the voice of remain dissent as he urged the prime minister to publish a Brexit white paper. Then the prime minister spoke and all became clear. Philp was just a convenient stooge to allow Theresa May to casually declare that the government would be publishing a white paper after all.

You could forgive Jeremy Corbyn for being momentarily wrongfooted. Prime minister’s questions are usually no more than a playground for personality disorders and not the forum in which serious policy announcements are made. But once he’d recovered from the shock, he should have been punching the air.

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The PM discombobulated the Labour leader with her announcement but was on shakier ground about her Trump date

Some blinked. Some gasped. Cognitive dissonance takes on many forms. Conservative Chris Philp is best known in the Commons for never letting any bum go unkissed and certainly not as a man to put a point of principle before his career, yet here he was sounding every bit the voice of remain dissent as he urged the prime minister to publish a Brexit white paper. Then the prime minister spoke and all became clear. Philp was just a convenient stooge to allow Theresa May to casually declare that the government would be publishing a white paper after all.

You could forgive Jeremy Corbyn for being momentarily wrongfooted. Prime minister’s questions are usually no more than a playground for personality disorders and not the forum in which serious policy announcements are made. But once he’d recovered from the shock, he should have been punching the air.

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Gina Miller: ‘I’ve been told that “as a coloured woman”, I’m not even human’

In an interview with the Guardian, the lead claimant in the supreme court case speaks about the price she has had to pay for taking on the government

Gina Miller, the woman behind the landmark article 50 legal case, has urged the government to forge a detailed plan for leaving the European Union, declaring that the abuse she endured after challenging against the government was “worth it”.

Related: As Gina Miller’s lawyers, we fought and won a victory for democracy | Emily Nicholson and Katy Colton

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In an interview with the Guardian, the lead claimant in the supreme court case speaks about the price she has had to pay for taking on the government

Gina Miller, the woman behind the landmark article 50 legal case, has urged the government to forge a detailed plan for leaving the European Union, declaring that the abuse she endured after challenging against the government was “worth it”.

Related: As Gina Miller’s lawyers, we fought and won a victory for democracy | Emily Nicholson and Katy Colton

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May’s Brexit white paper U-turn wrongfoots Corbyn, and Labour

Concession by PM may boost shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer but underlines pitfalls for his divided party

As every parent knows, leadership sometimes means knowing when to give in. Theresa May opened Wednesday’s prime minister’s questions with an unexpected concession – yet she still emerged victorious from her weekly bout with Jeremy Corbyn.

Rebel backbenchers in the prime minister’s own party, led by troublemaker-in-chief Anna Soubry, had united around the demand for the government to publish a formal white paper, setting out its priorities for the forthcoming negotiations.

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Concession by PM may boost shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer but underlines pitfalls for his divided party

As every parent knows, leadership sometimes means knowing when to give in. Theresa May opened Wednesday’s prime minister’s questions with an unexpected concession – yet she still emerged victorious from her weekly bout with Jeremy Corbyn.

Rebel backbenchers in the prime minister’s own party, led by troublemaker-in-chief Anna Soubry, had united around the demand for the government to publish a formal white paper, setting out its priorities for the forthcoming negotiations.

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Theresa May’s Brexit wishlist – Politics Weekly podcast

Anushka Asthana is joined in Westminster by Hugo Dixon, Heather Stewart and Jonathan Isaby to discuss Theresa May’s list of negotiating positions ahead of Brexit talks with the EU. We hear from Labour’s shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer and from two MPs on the Brexit committee: Labour’s Seema Malhotra and John Whittingdale of the Conservatives

Theresa May has set out what she calls a ‘plan for a global Britain’ in her most significant speech on Brexit yet. She announced that Britain would not seek to stay a member of the EU’s single market or of the customs union but acknowledged that a transition deal may be required. Despite this, Labour’s shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer tells us that this does not necessarily mean Britain is headed for a ‘hard Brexit’ but he is critical of threats to turn Britain into a ‘bargain basement’ tax haven.

Also this week: we hear from two members of the new Commons select committee on Brexit: Conservative MP John Whittingdale (a Brexit supporter) and Seema Malhotra, a Labour MP who supported Remain.

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Anushka Asthana is joined in Westminster by Hugo Dixon, Heather Stewart and Jonathan Isaby to discuss Theresa May’s list of negotiating positions ahead of Brexit talks with the EU. We hear from Labour’s shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer and from two MPs on the Brexit committee: Labour’s Seema Malhotra and John Whittingdale of the Conservatives

Theresa May has set out what she calls a ‘plan for a global Britain’ in her most significant speech on Brexit yet. She announced that Britain would not seek to stay a member of the EU’s single market or of the customs union but acknowledged that a transition deal may be required. Despite this, Labour’s shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer tells us that this does not necessarily mean Britain is headed for a ‘hard Brexit’ but he is critical of threats to turn Britain into a ‘bargain basement’ tax haven.

Also this week: we hear from two members of the new Commons select committee on Brexit: Conservative MP John Whittingdale (a Brexit supporter) and Seema Malhotra, a Labour MP who supported Remain.

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May’s meeting with Trump: a collision of contrasting world views

The PM’s visit could be seen as a diplomatic coup, but her vision of a free-trading Britain could crash into ‘America First’

Theresa May travels to the US on Thursday to try to forge a personal and political relationship with the least predictable and, in European terms, most unpopular US president in modern times.

For all the British diplomatic pleasure that their prime minister is once again the first foreign leader through the door of a newly elected president, as John Major managed in the case of Bill Clinton in 1993, there will be wariness in Downing Street. For the first time since the second world war, the US appears to have a president who displays indifference to supporting his allies or shoring up an alliance framework.

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The PM’s visit could be seen as a diplomatic coup, but her vision of a free-trading Britain could crash into ‘America First’

Theresa May travels to the US on Thursday to try to forge a personal and political relationship with the least predictable and, in European terms, most unpopular US president in modern times.

For all the British diplomatic pleasure that their prime minister is once again the first foreign leader through the door of a newly elected president, as John Major managed in the case of Bill Clinton in 1993, there will be wariness in Downing Street. For the first time since the second world war, the US appears to have a president who displays indifference to supporting his allies or shoring up an alliance framework.

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Labour NEC asked to inquire into Newham mayoral ‘trigger ballot’

Nearly 50 party members in the east London borough want their national governing body to inquire into their claims that the process for reselecting Sir Robin Wales was flawed

Labour Party members in Newham have sent a 13-page letter to Labour’s national executive committee (NEC) asking it to establish a “full inquiry” into the “affirmative nomination” process that saw the borough’s directly-elected mayor Sir Robin Wales declared the narrow winner of a “trigger ballot” to decide whether he should automatically go forward as their party’s mayoral candidate next year. It claims that “many failures of process/propriety and procedural irregularities” took place on the way to the outcome and urges the party’s governing body to halt the confirmation of Sir Robin until such an inquiry is complete.

Signed by 47 members of the east London borough’s two constituency Labour parties (CLPs), including ten Newham councillors, the letter sets out at length its case that “a number of [individual] ballots should be declared void or held in abeyance” and that the conduct of the process, which ran from 25 October to 4 December 2016, “made a material difference to the result”, tipping it in favour of Sir Robin by 20 votes to 17.

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Nearly 50 party members in the east London borough want their national governing body to inquire into their claims that the process for reselecting Sir Robin Wales was flawed

Labour Party members in Newham have sent a 13-page letter to Labour’s national executive committee (NEC) asking it to establish a “full inquiry” into the “affirmative nomination” process that saw the borough’s directly-elected mayor Sir Robin Wales declared the narrow winner of a “trigger ballot” to decide whether he should automatically go forward as their party’s mayoral candidate next year. It claims that “many failures of process/propriety and procedural irregularities” took place on the way to the outcome and urges the party’s governing body to halt the confirmation of Sir Robin until such an inquiry is complete.

Signed by 47 members of the east London borough’s two constituency Labour parties (CLPs), including ten Newham councillors, the letter sets out at length its case that “a number of [individual] ballots should be declared void or held in abeyance” and that the conduct of the process, which ran from 25 October to 4 December 2016, “made a material difference to the result”, tipping it in favour of Sir Robin by 20 votes to 17.

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May and Trump talks likely to reveal cracks in ‘special relationship’

British PM could struggle to negotiate good trade deal with president who has pledged to put America first

Appetite for a US trade deal with Britain appears as high in Washington as it is in London, according to interviews with politicians, with both governments anxious to demonstrate there is more to economic populism than simply a desire for protectionism.

But despite the political convergence indicated by Donald Trump’s election and the Brexit vote, Theresa May will discover the special relationship still has plenty of cracks and contradictions when she visits the White House on Friday.

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British PM could struggle to negotiate good trade deal with president who has pledged to put America first

Appetite for a US trade deal with Britain appears as high in Washington as it is in London, according to interviews with politicians, with both governments anxious to demonstrate there is more to economic populism than simply a desire for protectionism.

But despite the political convergence indicated by Donald Trump’s election and the Brexit vote, Theresa May will discover the special relationship still has plenty of cracks and contradictions when she visits the White House on Friday.

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Universities must do more to tackle the unfair, elitist admissions system

A new scheme aims to select students for their potential, not their grades. Why is this such a controversial idea?

The University of Bristol has just announced its Bristol Scholars scheme, which will offer places to five students from every school and college in the Bristol area on the basis of their potential rather than their actual attainment. It is an innovative move, at least in England, and has already attracted criticism.

The reactions of the Telegraph and the Times are predictable. But the scheme raises two big issues, as well as an opportunity for the sector. The first is philosophical: on what basis should universities select students? Is it a reward for endeavour at school or is selection based on the potential to succeed?

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A new scheme aims to select students for their potential, not their grades. Why is this such a controversial idea?

The University of Bristol has just announced its Bristol Scholars scheme, which will offer places to five students from every school and college in the Bristol area on the basis of their potential rather than their actual attainment. It is an innovative move, at least in England, and has already attracted criticism.

The reactions of the Telegraph and the Times are predictable. But the scheme raises two big issues, as well as an opportunity for the sector. The first is philosophical: on what basis should universities select students? Is it a reward for endeavour at school or is selection based on the potential to succeed?

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Ex-Labour MP Jamie Reed ‘turned down offer to defect to Tories’

Corbyn critic, who quit as MP for Copeland to take job at nuclear plant, says he was flattered but not tempted to cross floor

The former Labour MP Jamie Reed has revealed he turned down an offer to defect to the Conservative party, after being promised a job as a Treasury minister.

Reed, who quit as the MP for Copeland in December to take a job at the Sellafield nuclear plant, said he was shocked by the offer made over dinner with two Tory politicians last April.

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Corbyn critic, who quit as MP for Copeland to take job at nuclear plant, says he was flattered but not tempted to cross floor

The former Labour MP Jamie Reed has revealed he turned down an offer to defect to the Conservative party, after being promised a job as a Treasury minister.

Reed, who quit as the MP for Copeland in December to take a job at the Sellafield nuclear plant, said he was shocked by the offer made over dinner with two Tory politicians last April.

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Should Theresa May foster a ‘special relationship’ with Donald Trump?

The British PM’s visit to the United States to meet the new president is proving controversial with our readers

Theresa May will pledge to “renew the special relationship for this new age” when she meets with president Donald Trump on Friday.

Related: Theresa May to seek special deal with Trump in White House visit

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The British PM’s visit to the United States to meet the new president is proving controversial with our readers

Theresa May will pledge to “renew the special relationship for this new age” when she meets with president Donald Trump on Friday.

Related: Theresa May to seek special deal with Trump in White House visit

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Clive Lewis ‘threatens rebellion’ after Corbyn imposes 3-line whip on article 50 bill – Politics live

Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen

2.47pm GMT

Here’s my colleague Jessica Elgot’s full story on Jeremy Corbyn’s decision to impose a three-line whip on Labour MPs to vote for the article 50 bill.

Related: Article 50: Labour MPs consider resigning over Corbyn’s three-line whip

2.02pm GMT

According to a senior Labour source, Labour will not order its MPs to vote against the government programme motion allowing just five days for all the Commons debates on the article 50 bill. The source said that the timetable was set by the government, and that Labour’s priority has been to ensure that enough time is set aside for its amendments to get debated at committee and report stage.

Labour whips seem to be happy with the time they have been given. But the decision not to vote against the programme motion will anger Ben Bradshaw (see 12.58pm) and other Labour MPs who think the party should oppose it so that more time can be set aside for debate.

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Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen

2.47pm GMT

Here’s my colleague Jessica Elgot’s full story on Jeremy Corbyn’s decision to impose a three-line whip on Labour MPs to vote for the article 50 bill.

Related: Article 50: Labour MPs consider resigning over Corbyn’s three-line whip

2.02pm GMT

According to a senior Labour source, Labour will not order its MPs to vote against the government programme motion allowing just five days for all the Commons debates on the article 50 bill. The source said that the timetable was set by the government, and that Labour’s priority has been to ensure that enough time is set aside for its amendments to get debated at committee and report stage.

Labour whips seem to be happy with the time they have been given. But the decision not to vote against the programme motion will anger Ben Bradshaw (see 12.58pm) and other Labour MPs who think the party should oppose it so that more time can be set aside for debate.

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Brexit means ‘nnnnng, urggggh, bleugggh’ for a frustrated David Davis

After addressing the Commons, the Brexit secretary’s voice and patience were waning as he appeared before select committee

“Nnnnng. Urggggh. Bleugggh.” Roughly translated, this was David Davis’s way of saying he had lost his voice after being forced to spend two hours giving a statement to the House of Commons two days ago, following the government’s defeat in the supreme court, and was somewhat peeved to discover he was now required to answer Brexit departmental questions.

Hilary Benn, the chairman of the Brexit select committee, was the first to test the Brexit secretary’s voice and patience by asking who would arbitrate in future trade disputes once we had withdrawn from the European court of justice. “Nnnnng. Urggggh. Bleugggh,” said Davis. This appeared to mean that in the post-Brexit world order, everything would be sweetness and light, and if, in the unlikely event that there should be any minor disagreements, they could be patched up with the help of a relationship mediation counsellor. Dream on.

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After addressing the Commons, the Brexit secretary’s voice and patience were waning as he appeared before select committee

“Nnnnng. Urggggh. Bleugggh.” Roughly translated, this was David Davis’s way of saying he had lost his voice after being forced to spend two hours giving a statement to the House of Commons two days ago, following the government’s defeat in the supreme court, and was somewhat peeved to discover he was now required to answer Brexit departmental questions.

Hilary Benn, the chairman of the Brexit select committee, was the first to test the Brexit secretary’s voice and patience by asking who would arbitrate in future trade disputes once we had withdrawn from the European court of justice. “Nnnnng. Urggggh. Bleugggh,” said Davis. This appeared to mean that in the post-Brexit world order, everything would be sweetness and light, and if, in the unlikely event that there should be any minor disagreements, they could be patched up with the help of a relationship mediation counsellor. Dream on.

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Pursuing trade pacts outside EU ‘could mean worse Brexit deal for UK’

Attempts to secure free-trade agreements before UK actually leaves EU could rapidly sour Brexit negotiations, officials warn

Britain’s apparent determination to pursue trade talks with countries outside the EU could significantly undermine its efforts to negotiate a favourable Brexit deal and may well be illegal, diplomats and officials have warned.

Theresa May meets Donald Trump on Friday to discuss a post-Brexit transatlantic trade deal the president has said he would like drawn up “quickly”, while Australia has said talks this week should “begin to lay the foundations” of a similar pact with the UK.

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Attempts to secure free-trade agreements before UK actually leaves EU could rapidly sour Brexit negotiations, officials warn

Britain’s apparent determination to pursue trade talks with countries outside the EU could significantly undermine its efforts to negotiate a favourable Brexit deal and may well be illegal, diplomats and officials have warned.

Theresa May meets Donald Trump on Friday to discuss a post-Brexit transatlantic trade deal the president has said he would like drawn up “quickly”, while Australia has said talks this week should “begin to lay the foundations” of a similar pact with the UK.

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Jeremy Hunt’s hospital food revolution has failed, campaigners say

Department of Health study shows almost half of hospitals in England have not implemented key improvements

Jeremy Hunt has been accused of failing to deliver his promised revolution in hospital food after the health secretary’s own department found that many hospitals have still not improved patient catering.

A Department of Health study shows that almost half of hospitals in England have failed to implement key improvements almost two and a half years after Hunt’s crackdown.

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Department of Health study shows almost half of hospitals in England have not implemented key improvements

Jeremy Hunt has been accused of failing to deliver his promised revolution in hospital food after the health secretary’s own department found that many hospitals have still not improved patient catering.

A Department of Health study shows that almost half of hospitals in England have failed to implement key improvements almost two and a half years after Hunt’s crackdown.

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Car firms tell May post-Brexit tariffs are ‘red line’ issue that threatens jobs

Britain must keep some benefits of single market and customs union after Brexit, says chief executive of trade body SMMT

The car industry has told Theresa May that the introduction of tariffs after Britain leaves the EU is a “red line” issue that would lead to a fall in sales and potentially result in job losses.

In a severe warning about the consequences of a hard Brexit, Mike Hawes, the chief executive of the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, said tariffs would make UK car plants uncompetitive and it was critical that any trade deal with the EU contained some of the benefits of the single market and customs union.

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Britain must keep some benefits of single market and customs union after Brexit, says chief executive of trade body SMMT

The car industry has told Theresa May that the introduction of tariffs after Britain leaves the EU is a “red line” issue that would lead to a fall in sales and potentially result in job losses.

In a severe warning about the consequences of a hard Brexit, Mike Hawes, the chief executive of the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, said tariffs would make UK car plants uncompetitive and it was critical that any trade deal with the EU contained some of the benefits of the single market and customs union.

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Brexit ‘turf wars’ between ministries hindering progress, says report

Staff cuts and squabbles between departments are wasting time and energy as government attempts to implement Brexit plan, IfG says

Theresa May’s government is facing inter-departmental squabbles, concerns over staffing levels and “big challenges” drawing up legislation as it attempts to implement a Brexit strategy, analysis by Whitehall’s leading thinktank has found.

“Turf wars” between key departments led by Boris Johnson, David Davis and Liam Fox have been a distraction, wasting time and energy, the Institute for Government (IfG) report said.

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Staff cuts and squabbles between departments are wasting time and energy as government attempts to implement Brexit plan, IfG says

Theresa May’s government is facing inter-departmental squabbles, concerns over staffing levels and “big challenges” drawing up legislation as it attempts to implement a Brexit strategy, analysis by Whitehall’s leading thinktank has found.

“Turf wars” between key departments led by Boris Johnson, David Davis and Liam Fox have been a distraction, wasting time and energy, the Institute for Government (IfG) report said.

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Labour MPs back Tory’s call for mixed-gender civil partnerships

Twenty-five Labour MPs sign letter offering support for campaign to open up civil partnerships to heterosexual couples

Labour MPs have given their backing to a Conservative MP’s campaign to open up civil partnerships to heterosexual couples.

In a letter to the education secretary, Justine Greening, who is also the minister for women and equalities, 25 Labour MPs including the shadow women’s minister, Sarah Champion, and the former shadow cabinet ministers Angela Eagle, Chris Bryant and Liz Kendall say it is an issue of fairness that mixed-sex couples are allowed the legal certainty of a civil partnership without having to get married.

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Twenty-five Labour MPs sign letter offering support for campaign to open up civil partnerships to heterosexual couples

Labour MPs have given their backing to a Conservative MP’s campaign to open up civil partnerships to heterosexual couples.

In a letter to the education secretary, Justine Greening, who is also the minister for women and equalities, 25 Labour MPs including the shadow women’s minister, Sarah Champion, and the former shadow cabinet ministers Angela Eagle, Chris Bryant and Liz Kendall say it is an issue of fairness that mixed-sex couples are allowed the legal certainty of a civil partnership without having to get married.

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Boris Johnson signals shift in UK policy on Syria’s Assad

Foreign secretary says UK accepts Syrian leader should be allowed to run for re-election in event of peace deal

The UK accepts that Bashar al-Assad should be allowed to run for re-election in the event of a peace settlement in Syria, Boris Johnson has said, in a dramatic reversal of the British policy stretching back to the early days of the civil war that the president must go.

Speaking on the eve of Theresa May’s meeting with Donald Trump in Washington, the UK’s foreign secretary acknowledged that the inauguration of the new US president meant all sides needed to rethink their approach to Syria.

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Foreign secretary says UK accepts Syrian leader should be allowed to run for re-election in event of peace deal

The UK accepts that Bashar al-Assad should be allowed to run for re-election in the event of a peace settlement in Syria, Boris Johnson has said, in a dramatic reversal of the British policy stretching back to the early days of the civil war that the president must go.

Speaking on the eve of Theresa May’s meeting with Donald Trump in Washington, the UK’s foreign secretary acknowledged that the inauguration of the new US president meant all sides needed to rethink their approach to Syria.

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Article 50: Labour MPs consider resigning over Corbyn’s three-line whip

Clive Lewis and Tulip Siddiq among frontbenchers opposed to triggering Brexit as party leader says he expects all his MPs to vote in favour

Jeremy Corbyn will impose a three-line whip on MPs to vote in favour of triggering article 50 when the bill comes before parliament next week, with frontbenchers Clive Lewis and Tulip Siddiq understood to be considering resigning in protest.

Several shadow cabinet ministers are understood to have argued for a free vote, given the difference of opinion in the party, during a tense shadow cabinet meeting.

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Clive Lewis and Tulip Siddiq among frontbenchers opposed to triggering Brexit as party leader says he expects all his MPs to vote in favour

Jeremy Corbyn will impose a three-line whip on MPs to vote in favour of triggering article 50 when the bill comes before parliament next week, with frontbenchers Clive Lewis and Tulip Siddiq understood to be considering resigning in protest.

Several shadow cabinet ministers are understood to have argued for a free vote, given the difference of opinion in the party, during a tense shadow cabinet meeting.

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In pictures

Images of the historic day when millions of people across the UK voted in a referendum on whether the UK should remain in or leave the EU.Images of the historic day when millions of people across the UK voted in a referendum on whether the UK should remain in or leave the EU.

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‘Indyref 2’ being pushed online

As the EU referendum count turned decisively towards Leave, the online conversation in Scotland immediately turned to the possibility of another vote on independence.As the EU referendum count turned decisively towards Leave, the online conversation in Scotland immediately turned to the possibility of another vote on independence.

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