Jakarta governor election likely to go to second round

Racially and religiously charged election campaign has been test of tolerance in Indonesian capital

Initial results from Jakarta’s governor election, billed as a crucial test of Indonesia’s pluralism, indicate the tight race will go to a second round.

Several unofficial quick counts show the incumbent governor, Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, better known as Ahok, and challenger Anies Baswedan are neck and neck.

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Missing wage rises give lie to picture of full employment

With non-UK nationals representing most of 300,000 rise in number employed, labour supply is helping keep lid on wages

Britain has all the hallmarks of a full employment economy. The employment rate is at a record level, unemployment is at its lowest in more than a decade and the percentage of women working has never been higher since modern records began.

The one thing missing from this picture is an increase in wages. Full employment economies are normally good for workers because they take advantage of labour shortages to strike better deals with employers.

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Apple may replace iPhone home button with fingerprint-scanning screen

Newly published patent describes a system that scans the surface of a finger through a screen, removing the need for a separate Touch ID sensor

Apple is working on fitting fingerprint scanners beneath the screen of its iPhone, removing the need for a separate home button, a newly published patent has revealed.

The patent, purchased by Apple as part of its acquisition of a display company called LuxVue in 2014, details a system of using LEDs mounted underneath a display to both detect finger’s position and scan its surface to be able to read a fingerprint.

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North Korea: isolated state with a long history of assassinations

Kim Jong-nam’s death is believed to have been an ordered hit, if so it would not be the first time citizens were targeted abroad

Kim Jong-nam was almost certainly murdered by North Korean agents, according to intelligence officials in South Korea, as suspicions mount that his assassination at Kuala Lumpur airport was ordered by his estranged half-brother, the North Korean leader, Kim Jong-un.

Kim Jong-nam, Kim Jong-Il’s eldest son, was once seen as heir apparent, but fell out of favour in 2001 following a botched attempt to enter Japan on a forged passport and visit Disneyland. He lived in Macau while his brother took over the nuclear-armed state.

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Arizona unveils new death penalty plan: bring your own lethal injection drugs

The state’s execution protocol invites death row inmates’ lawyers to provide drugs to kill their own clients – a suggestion attorneys describe as ludicrous

As states have faced challenges to carrying out executions by lethal injection, various work-arounds and alternatives have been proposed, including the return of electric chairs and firing squads. Arizona may have come up with the most original concept yet: an invitation for lawyers to help kill their own clients.

With drugs that can legally be used for lethal injections in short supply, the Arizona department of corrections’ latest execution protocol states that attorneys for death row inmates are welcome to bring along their own.

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What are people in Stoke really thinking about? It’s not Brexit | Geoff Eze

With the byelection approaching, many of us feel the real issues confronting our community could be sidelined by this never-ending debate about the EU

I’m the vicar at All Saints Church, Hanley, in the heart of Stoke-on-Trent. My church began life in 1913 as a mission chapel for the poor. Built with an open-air pulpit, its founding congregation were the processions of impoverished workers winding their way up the hill across the road to the factory gates. At the time of our church’s construction, the Potteries was one of the great industrial wonders of the world. And then, one day, all that went. The four major pillars of industry that stood here 35 years ago – coal, steel, ceramics and manufacturing – the foundations on which the city was built, were swept away by the tremors of “progress”.

Our city now finds itself suffering from some of the highest unemployment rates in Britain. The decent jobs, which once gave people dignity, have trickled away – replaced by insecure, poorly paid work in services and distribution. The pubs, the labour clubs and the mutual societies that tethered these working communities together – that’s gone too. For decade, after decade, after decade, the working men and women of Stoke-on-Trent felt forgotten. But Brexit changed all that.

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Rolf Harris to be retried on three sexual offence charges

Former TV star, who faces retrial after jury were last week unable to reach verdict, will also face one new count

Rolf Harris, the former children’s entertainer and artist, is to be retried on three sexual offence charges on which a jury were last week unable to reach a verdict, and will face one new count.

Last week a jury found the 86-year-old Australian not guilty of three assaults following a trial at London’s Southwark crown court, but they were discharged from deliberating further on four undecided counts.

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Woman arrested on suspicion of faking own death in Zanzibar

Relatives of 45-year-old allegedly forged death certificate so that family could claim £140,000 in life insurance

A woman has been arrested on suspicion of faking her own death in Zanzibar, Tanzania, so her family could claim £140,000 in life insurance.

The 45-year-old woman, who has not been named, was tracked down in Canada after her son was arrested in the west Midlands and confessed to detectives that she was alive. She returned to the UK at the request of the police, and was arrested by the City of London’s insurance fraud squad.

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We will not pay: the Americans withholding their taxes to fight Trump

The new president has driven some to make a statement with their bank accounts – despite fears such a protest could send demonstrators to jail

Andrew Newman always pays his taxes, even if he hates what the government is doing with them. But not this year. For him, Donald Trump is the dealbreaker. He’ll pay his city and state taxes but will refuse to pay federal income tax as a cry of civil disobedience against the president and his new administration.

Newman is not alone. A nascent movement has been detected to revive the popularity of tax resistance – last seen en masse in America during the Vietnam war but which has been, sporadically, a tradition in the US and beyond going back many centuries.

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Police who killed Berlin attacker made pro-fascist statements online

Germany reportedly considered awarding Italian officers an award but cut short plans when pair’s social media posts emerged

Two Italian police officers who were hailed as heroes for killing the Berlin Christmas market attacker, Anis Amri, in Milan harboured pro-fascist sentiments, according to statements and images posted on their social media networks.

Amri, who killed 12 people when he ploughed a lorry into the crowded market, was shot two times by Luca Scatà and Cristian Movio in the early hours of 23 December. The police shooting was seen as a legitimate act of self defence.

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Pay growth slows despite record 74.6% employment rate

TUC says rising inflation means workers are struggling with slowest rate of real pay growth for two years

Britain’s workers are struggling to get pay rises despite record levels of employment, the latest official figures revealed.

Pay growth excluding bonuses slowed to 2.6% between October and December, from 2.7% in the previous quarter, according to the Office for National Statistics.

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Live chat with Peter Tatchell: what can we do to support LGBTI rights around the world?

Human rights activist Peter Tatchell answers questions about global LGBTI rights on Monday 20 February, 2-3.30pm

Peter Tatchell has been tirelessly campaigning for LGBTI human rights around the world for five decades. He staged the first gay rights protest in a communist country in East Germany in 1973, twice attempted a citizen’s arrest of the president of Zimbabwe Robert Mugabe (in 1999 and 2001) and was beaten by neo-Nazis at Moscow Pride parade in 2007.

In 1990 Tatchell was a founding member of the LGBT direct action organisation OutRage! He started campaigning for same-sex marriage in the UK in 1992. In 2013 he founded the Peter Tatchell Foundation which works on worldwide human rights campaigns.

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The NHS needs a rethink. Its priorities no longer make sense | Deborah Orr

Early intervention on mental health and proper social care are vital if the health service is to stop merely lurching from one crisis to the next

Theresa May is busy enacting the “will of the people”, seemingly unaware that she’s not actually in her own elevated position due to the “will of the people” at all. And the nation is looking on, mesmerised. We may look back on this period in British politics and marvel at how the country was so busy leaving Europe that it failed to see the disasters waiting to happen at home.

Every winter sees an NHS crisis. For years now, that crisis has been getting a little bit worse. But, as in the horrible theory of “boiling a frog”, the incrementally increasing danger becomes part of the environment. By the time the point of no return is passed, it’s too late to do anything other than submit to a fate that had always been predictable and could have been avoided if only the grave danger had been identified in time.

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The NHS needs a rethink. Its priorities no longer make sense | Deborah Orr

Early intervention on mental health and proper social care are vital if the health service is to stop merely lurching from one crisis to the next

Theresa May is busy enacting the “will of the people”, seemingly unaware that she’s not actually in her own elevated position due to the “will of the people” at all. And the nation is looking on, mesmerised. We may look back on this period in British politics and marvel at how the country was so busy leaving Europe that it failed to see the disasters waiting to happen at home.

Every winter sees an NHS crisis. For years now, that crisis has been getting a little bit worse. But, as in the horrible theory of “boiling a frog”, the incrementally increasing danger becomes part of the environment. By the time the point of no return is passed, it’s too late to do anything other than submit to a fate that had always been predictable and could have been avoided if only the grave danger had been identified in time.

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Hope at last? German left dreams of bringing Merkel years to end

Martin Schulz’s return from Brussels to Berlin is fuelling optimism that centre-left could make biggest breakthrough in years

If things go Johanna Uekermann’s way, she will wake up on 25 September to the news that Martin Schulz has soundly beaten Angela Merkel in the German elections.

“The era of Europe-wide austerity policies à la Merkel and [Wolfgang Schäuble, Germany’s finance minister] could finally become a thing of the past,” said the 29-year-old leader of the JuSos, the Social Democratic party’s (SPD) youth organisation.

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