Arsenal’s Wenger given four-match touchline ban

LONDON (Reuters) – Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger has been given a four-match touchline ban after admitting a Football Association (FA) misconduct charge for appearing to push the fourth official during their Premier League win over Burnley on Sunday.

LONDON (Reuters) – Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger has been given a four-match touchline ban after admitting a Football Association (FA) misconduct charge for appearing to push the fourth official during their Premier League win over Burnley on Sunday.


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Trump: Meeting with Peña Nieto would have been ‘fruitless’ – video

President Trump says his meeting with Peña Nieto, the president of Mexico – now cancelled – would have been ‘fruitless’. Speaking at a meeting of congressional Republicans in Philadelphia on Thursday, Trump argued that this would remain the case until Mexico treats the US with the necessary respect

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President Trump says his meeting with Peña Nieto, the president of Mexico – now cancelled – would have been ‘fruitless’. Speaking at a meeting of congressional Republicans in Philadelphia on Thursday, Trump argued that this would remain the case until Mexico treats the US with the necessary respect

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US could face human rights crisis after Trump’s xenophobic immigration orders

Hidden among the promise of a wall and the withdrawal of funding to sanctuary cities is a much more insidious – and immediate – move to replace the ‘catch and release’ border policy with mandatory detention

Donald Trump is now effectively at war with undocumented migrants inside the US and those who attempt to cross the southern border without paperwork.

Advisers and analysts alike have long suggested that Trump ought to be taken “seriously but not literally”, but Wednesday’s two executive orders on immigration show that he is living up to the blustering rhetoric of the 2016 election trail.

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Hidden among the promise of a wall and the withdrawal of funding to sanctuary cities is a much more insidious – and immediate – move to replace the ‘catch and release’ border policy with mandatory detention

Donald Trump is now effectively at war with undocumented migrants inside the US and those who attempt to cross the southern border without paperwork.

Advisers and analysts alike have long suggested that Trump ought to be taken “seriously but not literally”, but Wednesday’s two executive orders on immigration show that he is living up to the blustering rhetoric of the 2016 election trail.

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Trump’s first week was a crusade against everything. But we returned the favor | Rebecca Solnit

The president’s first week in office has felt like a civil war – but the insubordination of civil society has been beautiful to watch

On 2 January 2016, Ammon Bundy and a group of armed militants seized the headquarters of a remote wildlife refuge outpost in south-eastern Oregon. On 20 January 2017, Donald Trump and an unarmed band of extremists seized (through an election, it’s true, but one in which Trump lost the popular vote by a wide margin) the White House, and their first week in power has seemed as bellicose and extreme. Or more so really, since the scope is so much larger. As the journalist Jonathan Katz quipped: “First they came for the Latinos, Muslims, women, gays, poor people, intellectuals and scientists and then it was Wednesday.”

Related: ‘Global gag rule’ reinstated by Trump, curbing NGO abortion services abroad

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The president’s first week in office has felt like a civil war – but the insubordination of civil society has been beautiful to watch

On 2 January 2016, Ammon Bundy and a group of armed militants seized the headquarters of a remote wildlife refuge outpost in south-eastern Oregon. On 20 January 2017, Donald Trump and an unarmed band of extremists seized (through an election, it’s true, but one in which Trump lost the popular vote by a wide margin) the White House, and their first week in power has seemed as bellicose and extreme. Or more so really, since the scope is so much larger. As the journalist Jonathan Katz quipped: “First they came for the Latinos, Muslims, women, gays, poor people, intellectuals and scientists and then it was Wednesday.”

Related: ‘Global gag rule’ reinstated by Trump, curbing NGO abortion services abroad

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‘Global gag rule’ on abortion puts $9bn in health aid at risk, activists say

Donald Trump’s executive order prompts fears for groups fighting Aids and Zika and working against child and maternal deaths

Billions of dollars in US aid to groups combating diseases worldwide could be at risk from Donald’s Trump’s “unprecedented and far-reaching” reversal of abortion-related policy, campaigners warned on Tuesday.

Trump signed an executive order on Monday reinstating the “global gag rule”, which bans funding for groups that offer abortions or abortion advocacy, even if they use their own funds to do so.

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Donald Trump’s executive order prompts fears for groups fighting Aids and Zika and working against child and maternal deaths

Billions of dollars in US aid to groups combating diseases worldwide could be at risk from Donald’s Trump’s “unprecedented and far-reaching” reversal of abortion-related policy, campaigners warned on Tuesday.

Trump signed an executive order on Monday reinstating the “global gag rule”, which bans funding for groups that offer abortions or abortion advocacy, even if they use their own funds to do so.

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Dutch respond to Trump’s ‘gag rule’ with international safe abortion fund

  • Up to 20 countries indicate support for fund to plug $600m funding gap
  • Netherlands minister: ‘It’s important to stand your ground’

Up to 20 countries have indicated support for the Netherlands’ plan to set up an international safe abortion fund to plug a $600m funding gap caused by Donald Trump’s reinstatement of the “global gag rule”, the Dutch international development minister, Lilianne Ploumen, said on Wednesday.

Ploumen took soundings from a number of her colleagues around the world on Tuesday evening after the Netherlands said it would act to mitigate the impact on hundreds of charities around the world.

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  • Up to 20 countries indicate support for fund to plug $600m funding gap
  • Netherlands minister: ‘It’s important to stand your ground’

Up to 20 countries have indicated support for the Netherlands’ plan to set up an international safe abortion fund to plug a $600m funding gap caused by Donald Trump’s reinstatement of the “global gag rule”, the Dutch international development minister, Lilianne Ploumen, said on Wednesday.

Ploumen took soundings from a number of her colleagues around the world on Tuesday evening after the Netherlands said it would act to mitigate the impact on hundreds of charities around the world.

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‘Global gag rule’ could have dire impact in Latin America, activists warn

Reinstatement of policy by Donald Trump could have ‘chilling impact’ in region that already has high rates of teenage pregnancy and maternal mortality

Donald Trump’s reversal of abortion-related aid policy will have a “chilling impact” on Latin America, say family-planning campaigners in a region that already has some of the world’s highest rates of teenage pregnancy and maternal mortality.

The so-called global gag rule, which was signed into effect by the new US president on Monday, withholds USAid funding from any organisation that offers abortion services or information.

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Reinstatement of policy by Donald Trump could have ‘chilling impact’ in region that already has high rates of teenage pregnancy and maternal mortality

Donald Trump’s reversal of abortion-related aid policy will have a “chilling impact” on Latin America, say family-planning campaigners in a region that already has some of the world’s highest rates of teenage pregnancy and maternal mortality.

The so-called global gag rule, which was signed into effect by the new US president on Monday, withholds USAid funding from any organisation that offers abortion services or information.

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‘Global gag rule’ jeopardises future of Asia health initiatives, campaigners say

Funding for programmes from sanitation to nutrition will be subject to Trump’s far-reaching order, with huge implications for family planning providers

Women’s health advocates across Asia have said Donald Trump’s decision to reinstate and beef up the “global gag rule” will result in hundreds of thousands of unwanted pregnancies and imperil programmes aimed at improving sanitation, treating Aids and protecting LGBT activists.

Health providers and advocacy groups in Delhi, Phnom Penh, Jakarta and beyond have been holding emergency meetings since Tuesday’s announcement that US aid funding was now contingent on organisations abandoning their abortion advocacy work, services or information.

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Funding for programmes from sanitation to nutrition will be subject to Trump’s far-reaching order, with huge implications for family planning providers

Women’s health advocates across Asia have said Donald Trump’s decision to reinstate and beef up the “global gag rule” will result in hundreds of thousands of unwanted pregnancies and imperil programmes aimed at improving sanitation, treating Aids and protecting LGBT activists.

Health providers and advocacy groups in Delhi, Phnom Penh, Jakarta and beyond have been holding emergency meetings since Tuesday’s announcement that US aid funding was now contingent on organisations abandoning their abortion advocacy work, services or information.

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‘Global gag rule’: stop playing politics with women’s lives, MSF tells Trump

As affected groups worldwide take in news of Donald Trump’s renewal of a policy that has dire implications for family planning, Médecins Sans Frontières has aimed a broadside at the US president’s stance

Médecins Sans Frontières has told the Trump administration to stop “playing politics” with women’s rights and other global health efforts after the new US president reintroduced a policy likely to affect millions of women and girls around the world.

The “global gag rule”, which was reinstated by Donald Trump on Monday, withholds USAid funding from any overseas family planning organisation that offers or provides information about abortions.

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As affected groups worldwide take in news of Donald Trump’s renewal of a policy that has dire implications for family planning, Médecins Sans Frontières has aimed a broadside at the US president’s stance

Médecins Sans Frontières has told the Trump administration to stop “playing politics” with women’s rights and other global health efforts after the new US president reintroduced a policy likely to affect millions of women and girls around the world.

The “global gag rule”, which was reinstated by Donald Trump on Monday, withholds USAid funding from any overseas family planning organisation that offers or provides information about abortions.

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Mozambique fell prey to the promise of fabulous wealth – now it can’t pay nurses

Nurses and teachers are among those bearing the brunt of a debt crisis rooted in the mistaken belief that major gas reserves would bring untold riches

Mozambique’s £1.6bn borrowing spree has caused a fiscal crisis that means interest on loans, civil service new year bonuses and other government bills was not paid this month.

Four years ago, with one of Africa’s largest natural gas reserves in development and visions of fabulous wealth before them, Mozambique’s leaders took secret loans worth $2bn. These were organised by the London offices of two major European banks, Credit Suisse and the Russian state-owned bank VTB, the conduct of whom was sufficiently questionable that they are now being investigated by financial authorities in the UK, Switzerland and the US.

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Nurses and teachers are among those bearing the brunt of a debt crisis rooted in the mistaken belief that major gas reserves would bring untold riches

Mozambique’s £1.6bn borrowing spree has caused a fiscal crisis that means interest on loans, civil service new year bonuses and other government bills was not paid this month.

Four years ago, with one of Africa’s largest natural gas reserves in development and visions of fabulous wealth before them, Mozambique’s leaders took secret loans worth $2bn. These were organised by the London offices of two major European banks, Credit Suisse and the Russian state-owned bank VTB, the conduct of whom was sufficiently questionable that they are now being investigated by financial authorities in the UK, Switzerland and the US.

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‘I want to kill these dogs’: question of whether to cull strays divides Yangon

Myanmar’s commercial capital is overrun with an estimated 120,000 stray dogs, which attack children and carry the threat of rabies. Mass culling was recently stopped but spay, neuter and vaccinate programmes have yet to start

Zu May Naing was playing with her brother outside their house in Bago Region, close to Myanmar’s commercial capital of Yangon, last month when a pack of stray dogs rounded on the 18-month-old.

Her mother, San Thar Myint, found her lying prone on the ground, bleeding and in shock. “Her temperature was over 100 [degrees fahrenheit] before they got to the operation room,” she says.

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Myanmar’s commercial capital is overrun with an estimated 120,000 stray dogs, which attack children and carry the threat of rabies. Mass culling was recently stopped but spay, neuter and vaccinate programmes have yet to start

Zu May Naing was playing with her brother outside their house in Bago Region, close to Myanmar’s commercial capital of Yangon, last month when a pack of stray dogs rounded on the 18-month-old.

Her mother, San Thar Myint, found her lying prone on the ground, bleeding and in shock. “Her temperature was over 100 [degrees fahrenheit] before they got to the operation room,” she says.

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Will New York get a Brexit boost to cancel out feared ‘Trump slump’?

While European cities led by Paris and Frankfurt wage campaigns for London’s financial business, some experts predict New York could benefit most of all from the fallout of Brexit on the UK capital

New York and London function as two prongs of one global economy. Banks and other financial companies headquartered in New York usually have their second biggest offices in the British capital, and vice versa.

For years, that’s made economic sense. For London-based companies, New York provides an unparalleled density of financial firms, a regulatory framework in which to do business, and access to non-European markets. London provides much of the same for New York-based companies who need access to European markets.

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While European cities led by Paris and Frankfurt wage campaigns for London’s financial business, some experts predict New York could benefit most of all from the fallout of Brexit on the UK capital

New York and London function as two prongs of one global economy. Banks and other financial companies headquartered in New York usually have their second biggest offices in the British capital, and vice versa.

For years, that’s made economic sense. For London-based companies, New York provides an unparalleled density of financial firms, a regulatory framework in which to do business, and access to non-European markets. London provides much of the same for New York-based companies who need access to European markets.

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The future of the US-Mexican border: inside the ‘split city’ of El Paso-Juárez

One has been called the world’s most violent city. The other, the safest in its nation. Schoolchildren commute daily between the ‘binational’ cities of Juárez, Mexico and El Paso, Texas – but with Trump in office, will border divisions grow?

Unlike most teenagers, Ashley Delgado starts her school day by crossing an international border. She gets up at 5am so her mother Dora can drive through Juárez’s dense traffic to the Paso del Norte bridge, where she follows the caged pathway between Mexico and the United States by foot. Clearing customs takes on average half an hour, but often it’s double that – depending on the line and the guards’ moods.

“Sometimes they put people in a little room for investigation and start to ask questions,” says the 14-year-old as her mum picks her up from the Mexican side at the end of a school day. “Where are you from? What are you bringing? What are you going to do in the US? It’s never happened to me, but to some of my friends it happens every three days.

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One has been called the world’s most violent city. The other, the safest in its nation. Schoolchildren commute daily between the ‘binational’ cities of Juárez, Mexico and El Paso, Texas – but with Trump in office, will border divisions grow?

Unlike most teenagers, Ashley Delgado starts her school day by crossing an international border. She gets up at 5am so her mother Dora can drive through Juárez’s dense traffic to the Paso del Norte bridge, where she follows the caged pathway between Mexico and the United States by foot. Clearing customs takes on average half an hour, but often it’s double that – depending on the line and the guards’ moods.

“Sometimes they put people in a little room for investigation and start to ask questions,” says the 14-year-old as her mum picks her up from the Mexican side at the end of a school day. “Where are you from? What are you bringing? What are you going to do in the US? It’s never happened to me, but to some of my friends it happens every three days.

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Frankfurt prepares for Brexit bankers: ‘Maybe our city will change them’

‘Boring’ Frankfurt is set to attract financial businesses from London with its accessibility, low property costs and family-friendly facilities. ‘Maybe these play hard, work hard people will start to enjoy the slower pace,’ hopes one resident

In the heart of the Frankfurt banking district of Westend, Luise Hoepfner serves a steady stream of office workers her lunchtime menu of organic salads, soups and spelt-flour savoury tarts. The 28-year-old worked in event management for several years before opening her restaurant Vif (old German for “chipper” or “lively”) on Mendelssohnstrasse in September.

“I am convinced this is the right time to invest in Frankfurt,” Hoepfner says. “It’s cheaper than London – just – and it’s growing all the time. When Brexit happens, whatever form that takes, it will only increase the demand.”

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‘Boring’ Frankfurt is set to attract financial businesses from London with its accessibility, low property costs and family-friendly facilities. ‘Maybe these play hard, work hard people will start to enjoy the slower pace,’ hopes one resident

In the heart of the Frankfurt banking district of Westend, Luise Hoepfner serves a steady stream of office workers her lunchtime menu of organic salads, soups and spelt-flour savoury tarts. The 28-year-old worked in event management for several years before opening her restaurant Vif (old German for “chipper” or “lively”) on Mendelssohnstrasse in September.

“I am convinced this is the right time to invest in Frankfurt,” Hoepfner says. “It’s cheaper than London – just – and it’s growing all the time. When Brexit happens, whatever form that takes, it will only increase the demand.”

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Turkey and Russia skeptical of Trump’s plan to create safe havens in Syria

US president’s proposal met with caution from Russian and Turkish officials over northern safe zones as others fear possible intention to keep refugees out of US

Donald Trump’s proposal to set up safe havens in northern Syria has been met with caution by his allies and skepticism by others who fear the plan is aimed more at keeping refugees out of the US than providing for humanitarian needs.

Turkey and Russia, on whom such a plan would heavily depend, on Thursday said they had not been consulted, hours after the US president pledged to “absolutely do safe zones in Syria for the people”. Moscow said it was important not to “exacerbate the situation”, while Ankara said a safe zone had already been set up under its auspices.

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US president’s proposal met with caution from Russian and Turkish officials over northern safe zones as others fear possible intention to keep refugees out of US

Donald Trump’s proposal to set up safe havens in northern Syria has been met with caution by his allies and skepticism by others who fear the plan is aimed more at keeping refugees out of the US than providing for humanitarian needs.

Turkey and Russia, on whom such a plan would heavily depend, on Thursday said they had not been consulted, hours after the US president pledged to “absolutely do safe zones in Syria for the people”. Moscow said it was important not to “exacerbate the situation”, while Ankara said a safe zone had already been set up under its auspices.

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Deadly wildfire razes entire town in Chile: ‘Literally like Dante’s Inferno’

One body found in smouldering ruins of Santa Olga, the worst-hit of several smaller communities, as hot, dry weather fuels fiercest fires in recent history

An entire town has been consumed by flames in Chile as unusually hot, dry weather undermined efforts to combat the worst forest fires in the country’s recent history.

Related: Chile battles devastating wildfires: ‘We have never seen anything on this scale’

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One body found in smouldering ruins of Santa Olga, the worst-hit of several smaller communities, as hot, dry weather fuels fiercest fires in recent history

An entire town has been consumed by flames in Chile as unusually hot, dry weather undermined efforts to combat the worst forest fires in the country’s recent history.

Related: Chile battles devastating wildfires: ‘We have never seen anything on this scale’

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Japan’s annual consumer prices fall for first time in four years

Prime minister Shinzo Abe has spent the past four years trying to coax consumers into spending more

Shinzo Abe’s mission to lift Japan out of the deflationary spiral that has plagued its economy for two decades suffered another setback on Friday after data showed annual consumer prices had fallen for the first time in four years.

The data will add to the prime minister’s frustration that years of massive monetary easing and fiscal stimulus have so far failed to drag Japan out of the deflationary abyss, although the recent recovery in oil prices offers some cause for optimism.

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Prime minister Shinzo Abe has spent the past four years trying to coax consumers into spending more

Shinzo Abe’s mission to lift Japan out of the deflationary spiral that has plagued its economy for two decades suffered another setback on Friday after data showed annual consumer prices had fallen for the first time in four years.

The data will add to the prime minister’s frustration that years of massive monetary easing and fiscal stimulus have so far failed to drag Japan out of the deflationary abyss, although the recent recovery in oil prices offers some cause for optimism.

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Trump pressured parks chief for photos to prove ‘media lied’ about inauguration crowd – report

Post story came as reports suggested Trump had been obsessed with stories that accurately said inauguration had noticeably smaller crowd than Obama’s in 2009

Donald Trump ordered the National Park Service director to produce additional photographs of his inauguration crowds, believing the images “might prove that the media had lied” about the size of the audience, according to the Washington Post.

Related: Trump’s inauguration crowd: Sean Spicer’s claims versus the evidence

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Post story came as reports suggested Trump had been obsessed with stories that accurately said inauguration had noticeably smaller crowd than Obama’s in 2009

Donald Trump ordered the National Park Service director to produce additional photographs of his inauguration crowds, believing the images “might prove that the media had lied” about the size of the audience, according to the Washington Post.

Related: Trump’s inauguration crowd: Sean Spicer’s claims versus the evidence

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Mike Pence proclaims ‘life is winning again in America’ at March for Life in DC

‘Largest pro-life event in the world’ comes less than a week after millions marched against Trump, with a sitting vice-president attending for first time

On Tuesday night, Mikki Deters and her younger sister, Marcail, boarded a bus in Wichita, Kansas. Twenty-four hours later, the sisters arrived in the nation’s capital, where on Friday they would join thousands of pro-life activists in a march along National Mall to the steps of the supreme court that 44 years ago legalized abortion.

They waited in the winding security line awash with posters that read, “I am the pro-life generation” and “Don’t need Planned Parenthood”. Some held graphic images of fetuses while others chose more subtle messaging: “Trump loves the bump” and “A person’s a person no matter how small – Dr Seuss” read one young girl’s colorful sign decorated with stickers.

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‘Largest pro-life event in the world’ comes less than a week after millions marched against Trump, with a sitting vice-president attending for first time

On Tuesday night, Mikki Deters and her younger sister, Marcail, boarded a bus in Wichita, Kansas. Twenty-four hours later, the sisters arrived in the nation’s capital, where on Friday they would join thousands of pro-life activists in a march along National Mall to the steps of the supreme court that 44 years ago legalized abortion.

They waited in the winding security line awash with posters that read, “I am the pro-life generation” and “Don’t need Planned Parenthood”. Some held graphic images of fetuses while others chose more subtle messaging: “Trump loves the bump” and “A person’s a person no matter how small – Dr Seuss” read one young girl’s colorful sign decorated with stickers.

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Carlos Slim on Trump’s border wall plans: ‘The best wall is investment’

Mexican billionaire praises US president as ‘great negotiator’ but calls for development and employment rather than barrier

The Mexican telecom magnate Carlos Slim has criticized Donald Trump’s plans for a border wall, saying that frontier security would be better achieved through investment and job creation in Mexico.

“The best wall is investment, development and employment opportunities,” said Slim, speaking to reporters at a rare press conference. “People leave Mexico in search of opportunities, not because they’re tourists.”

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Mexican billionaire praises US president as ‘great negotiator’ but calls for development and employment rather than barrier

The Mexican telecom magnate Carlos Slim has criticized Donald Trump’s plans for a border wall, saying that frontier security would be better achieved through investment and job creation in Mexico.

“The best wall is investment, development and employment opportunities,” said Slim, speaking to reporters at a rare press conference. “People leave Mexico in search of opportunities, not because they’re tourists.”

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Dumped One Nation candidate says Pauline Hanson could face revolt

North Queensland candidate Peter Rogers, sacked over article on his website, says post was made by friend without his knowledge

Pauline Hanson’s One Nation has dumped the north Queensland candidate whose website posted a conspiracy-laden article alleging the Port Arthur massacre and the death of a Syrian toddler who drowned at sea were fabrications.

Peter Rogers was dumped as the party’s candidate for the seat of Mulgrave on Friday night, two weeks after the post came to light.

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North Queensland candidate Peter Rogers, sacked over article on his website, says post was made by friend without his knowledge

Pauline Hanson’s One Nation has dumped the north Queensland candidate whose website posted a conspiracy-laden article alleging the Port Arthur massacre and the death of a Syrian toddler who drowned at sea were fabrications.

Peter Rogers was dumped as the party’s candidate for the seat of Mulgrave on Friday night, two weeks after the post came to light.

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Squatters turn oligarch’s empty London property into homeless shelter

Vast £15m home bought by Russian Andrey Goncharenko, who wants to add a pool and leisure centre, is housing about 25 people

A veteran group of squatters has occupied an empty £15m central London property purchased by a Russian oligarch in 2014 and opened it as a homeless shelter.

The extensive, five-storey Grade ll-listed Eaton Square property was bought by Andrey Goncharenko, a little-known oligarch who has bought a number of luxury properties in London in recent years.

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Vast £15m home bought by Russian Andrey Goncharenko, who wants to add a pool and leisure centre, is housing about 25 people

A veteran group of squatters has occupied an empty £15m central London property purchased by a Russian oligarch in 2014 and opened it as a homeless shelter.

The extensive, five-storey Grade ll-listed Eaton Square property was bought by Andrey Goncharenko, a little-known oligarch who has bought a number of luxury properties in London in recent years.

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Will Trump return USA to dark days of ‘war on terror’ black sites?

President appears to believe ‘torture works’ – raising prospect of reviving techniques the CIA had moved away from

One of the common features of the multiple conflicts that followed the 9/11 attacks on the US was the use of secret prisons. Islamic extremists used them – most notably Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the leader of al-Qaida in Iraq – and so did a range of states in the Middle East, south Asia and beyond. Many had been doing so for many years.

But one of the most enthusiastic users of secret prisons – and torture – in the years following 9/11 was the USA. Its sites eventually numbered more than 100, it is believed, spanning half the world. It is this network of “black sites” that Donald Trump appears to be considering reviving.

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President appears to believe ‘torture works’ – raising prospect of reviving techniques the CIA had moved away from

One of the common features of the multiple conflicts that followed the 9/11 attacks on the US was the use of secret prisons. Islamic extremists used them – most notably Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the leader of al-Qaida in Iraq – and so did a range of states in the Middle East, south Asia and beyond. Many had been doing so for many years.

But one of the most enthusiastic users of secret prisons – and torture – in the years following 9/11 was the USA. Its sites eventually numbered more than 100, it is believed, spanning half the world. It is this network of “black sites” that Donald Trump appears to be considering reviving.

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Romania’s corruption fight is a smokescreen to weaken its democracy

Turning a blind eye to this abuse of power risks encouraging other European nations to follow its example

The recent rise of the populist right in Hungary and Poland has raised the alarm about the future of democracy in Europe, as constitutional safeguards, media pluralism and civil society come under sustained attack.

But there is another threat hiding in plain sight: the abuse of anti-corruption laws in Romania, a country often lauded as an example of successful reform in central and eastern Europe.

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Turning a blind eye to this abuse of power risks encouraging other European nations to follow its example

The recent rise of the populist right in Hungary and Poland has raised the alarm about the future of democracy in Europe, as constitutional safeguards, media pluralism and civil society come under sustained attack.

But there is another threat hiding in plain sight: the abuse of anti-corruption laws in Romania, a country often lauded as an example of successful reform in central and eastern Europe.

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‘My neighbour murdered nearly all of my family, but now we are friends’

Thanks to a pioneering reconciliation project survivors and perpetrators of the Rwandan genocide now live side by side

In a leafy, quiet district less than an hour’s drive from Rwanda’s capital, the calmness of the community of Mbyo belies the dark and traumatic past of its inhabitants.

Related: My journey back to Rwanda: confronting the ghosts of the genocide 21 years later

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Thanks to a pioneering reconciliation project survivors and perpetrators of the Rwandan genocide now live side by side

In a leafy, quiet district less than an hour’s drive from Rwanda’s capital, the calmness of the community of Mbyo belies the dark and traumatic past of its inhabitants.

Related: My journey back to Rwanda: confronting the ghosts of the genocide 21 years later

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Ebola, war … but just two psychiatrists to deal with a nation’s trauma

Overwhelmed counsellors and medical staff in Sierra Leone must contend with suspicion and a collapse in funding

The history of Africa’s oldest psychiatric hospital is written on the walls of its isolation units, desperate messages chiselled into the woodwork like scars. “I came here for I don’t have any money,” reads one note in a corner of the room. “People want me to run from my father’s house,” reads another. “You go nowhere,” announces a third. “Stay out.”

Since the hospital opened in the early 19th century, most Sierra Leoneans have aspired to do exactly that, avoiding this imposing building perched high on a hill above the capital, Freetown.

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Overwhelmed counsellors and medical staff in Sierra Leone must contend with suspicion and a collapse in funding

The history of Africa’s oldest psychiatric hospital is written on the walls of its isolation units, desperate messages chiselled into the woodwork like scars. “I came here for I don’t have any money,” reads one note in a corner of the room. “People want me to run from my father’s house,” reads another. “You go nowhere,” announces a third. “Stay out.”

Since the hospital opened in the early 19th century, most Sierra Leoneans have aspired to do exactly that, avoiding this imposing building perched high on a hill above the capital, Freetown.

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Theresa May and Trump: PM shows lengths she’ll go to for Britain | John Crace

She endured having her hand held by the US president but it could have been worse. She got out with some self-respect intact. Not much, but some

The body language could hardly have been more awkward as Theresa May and Donald Trump posed for their blind date in front of the bust of Winston Churchill in the Oval Office. The prime minister kept her distance and looked faintly embarrassed, as if it was only just dawning on her that the main reason she was the first foreign leader to meet the US president was because all the others had thought better of it. That and the fact she was a bit desperate. Britain doesn’t have as many friends as it used to.

Trump merely looked a bit blank. Perhaps this was because the British prime minister wasn’t the woman he had been expecting. All morning the White House had been tweeting that he was about to meet Teresa May, the spelling mistake turning the prime minister into a porn star. The special relationship has always been rather more special to us than the Americans. As the two leaders finally shook hands, the bust of Churchill covered its eyes and begged to be sent back to Britain. Their hands remained uneasily entwined as they walked down the colonnade towards the Palm Room. When Trump started to creepily stroke her hand, Theresa almost retched. She quickly pulled herself together and reminded herself to just think of England. Sometimes you had to take one for the team.

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She endured having her hand held by the US president but it could have been worse. She got out with some self-respect intact. Not much, but some

The body language could hardly have been more awkward as Theresa May and Donald Trump posed for their blind date in front of the bust of Winston Churchill in the Oval Office. The prime minister kept her distance and looked faintly embarrassed, as if it was only just dawning on her that the main reason she was the first foreign leader to meet the US president was because all the others had thought better of it. That and the fact she was a bit desperate. Britain doesn’t have as many friends as it used to.

Trump merely looked a bit blank. Perhaps this was because the British prime minister wasn’t the woman he had been expecting. All morning the White House had been tweeting that he was about to meet Teresa May, the spelling mistake turning the prime minister into a porn star. The special relationship has always been rather more special to us than the Americans. As the two leaders finally shook hands, the bust of Churchill covered its eyes and begged to be sent back to Britain. Their hands remained uneasily entwined as they walked down the colonnade towards the Palm Room. When Trump started to creepily stroke her hand, Theresa almost retched. She quickly pulled herself together and reminded herself to just think of England. Sometimes you had to take one for the team.

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Trump ‘100% behind Nato’, says May at joint White House press conference – as it happened

Rolling coverage of Donald Trump and Theresa May’s joint press conference at the White House

8.41pm GMT

Today we have reaffirmed our unshakeable commitment to this alliance. Mr President, I think you confirmed that you are 100% behind Nato.

I am not as brash as you might think. I think we are going to get along very well … I am a people person – I think you are also Theresa.

I can often tell how I will get along with somebody very early and I believe we are going to have a fantastic relationship.

Not sure the PM has ever been called “a people person” before pic.twitter.com/Dbk3w9bWOO

As the president himself said, I think we have already struck up a good relationship. You ask what we have in common. I think if you look at the approach that we are both taking, one of the things we have in common is that we want to put the interests of ordinary working people right up there centre stage.

I have been listening to the president and the president has been listening to me. That’s the point of having a conversation and a dialogue.

There will be times when we disagree and issues on which we disagree. The point of the special relationship is that we are able to have that open and frank discussion so we are able to make that clear when it happens.

We have a great general who has just been appointed secretary of defence, general James Mattis and he has stated publicly that he does not necessarily believe in torture or waterboarding – or however you want to define it. Enhanced interrogation would be words that a lot of people would like to use.

I don’t necessarily agree but he will override because I am giving him that power. He is an expert, he is highly respected, he is the general’s general.

I don’t know the gentleman. I hope we have a fantastic relationship. That’s possible and it’s also possible that we won’t. We will see what happens …

I have had many times where I thought I would get along with people and I don’t like them at all. And I have had some where I didn’t think I was going to have much of a relationship and it turned out to be a great relationship.

I think Brexit is going to be a wonderful thing for your country.

When it irons out you are going to have your own identity and you are going to have the people that you want in your country and you are going to be able to make free trade deals without having somebody watching you and what you are doing.

8.20pm GMT

This is the question from the BBC’s Laura Kuenssberg that impressed Tim Farron. (See 8.08pm.) She asked:

Mr President, you’ve said before that torture works, you’ve praised Russia, you’ve said you want to ban some Muslims from coming to America, you’ve suggested there should be punishment for abortion. For many people in Britain those sound like alarming beliefs. What do you say to our viewers at home who are worried about some of your views and worried about you becoming the leader of the free world?

This was your choice of a question? … There goes that relationship.

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Rolling coverage of Donald Trump and Theresa May’s joint press conference at the White House

8.41pm GMT

Today we have reaffirmed our unshakeable commitment to this alliance. Mr President, I think you confirmed that you are 100% behind Nato.

I am not as brash as you might think. I think we are going to get along very well … I am a people person – I think you are also Theresa.

I can often tell how I will get along with somebody very early and I believe we are going to have a fantastic relationship.

Not sure the PM has ever been called “a people person” before pic.twitter.com/Dbk3w9bWOO

As the president himself said, I think we have already struck up a good relationship. You ask what we have in common. I think if you look at the approach that we are both taking, one of the things we have in common is that we want to put the interests of ordinary working people right up there centre stage.

I have been listening to the president and the president has been listening to me. That’s the point of having a conversation and a dialogue.

There will be times when we disagree and issues on which we disagree. The point of the special relationship is that we are able to have that open and frank discussion so we are able to make that clear when it happens.

We have a great general who has just been appointed secretary of defence, general James Mattis and he has stated publicly that he does not necessarily believe in torture or waterboarding – or however you want to define it. Enhanced interrogation would be words that a lot of people would like to use.

I don’t necessarily agree but he will override because I am giving him that power. He is an expert, he is highly respected, he is the general’s general.

I don’t know the gentleman. I hope we have a fantastic relationship. That’s possible and it’s also possible that we won’t. We will see what happens …

I have had many times where I thought I would get along with people and I don’t like them at all. And I have had some where I didn’t think I was going to have much of a relationship and it turned out to be a great relationship.

I think Brexit is going to be a wonderful thing for your country.

When it irons out you are going to have your own identity and you are going to have the people that you want in your country and you are going to be able to make free trade deals without having somebody watching you and what you are doing.

8.20pm GMT

This is the question from the BBC’s Laura Kuenssberg that impressed Tim Farron. (See 8.08pm.) She asked:

Mr President, you’ve said before that torture works, you’ve praised Russia, you’ve said you want to ban some Muslims from coming to America, you’ve suggested there should be punishment for abortion. For many people in Britain those sound like alarming beliefs. What do you say to our viewers at home who are worried about some of your views and worried about you becoming the leader of the free world?

This was your choice of a question? … There goes that relationship.

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Trump signs ‘extreme vetting’ executive order for people entering the US

Trump announced and signed executive action that has widely been reported as a temporary ban on refugees and immigrants from Muslim-majority countries

The United States will impose draconian new “extreme vetting” measures for people entering the country, as part of an attempt by Donald Trump to “keep radical Islamic terrorists out”.

“We are establishing new vetting measures, to keep radical Islamic terrorists out of the United States of America,” the president said on Friday, during a visit to the Department of Defense. “We don’t want ‘em here. We want to ensure we aren’t admitting into our country the very threats that our men and women are fighting overseas.”

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Trump announced and signed executive action that has widely been reported as a temporary ban on refugees and immigrants from Muslim-majority countries

The United States will impose draconian new “extreme vetting” measures for people entering the country, as part of an attempt by Donald Trump to “keep radical Islamic terrorists out”.

“We are establishing new vetting measures, to keep radical Islamic terrorists out of the United States of America,” the president said on Friday, during a visit to the Department of Defense. “We don’t want ‘em here. We want to ensure we aren’t admitting into our country the very threats that our men and women are fighting overseas.”

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Human rights not on the agenda for Theresa May’s visit to Turkey

Trade and security will be the dominant issues despite a crackdown by the Turkish president on thousands of opponents

Theresa May plans to focus on trade and security cooperation in talks with Turkish leaders in Ankara on Saturday, amid growing concerns about the country’s human rights record.

Thousands of journalists and political critics have been jailed in a crackdown on President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s opponents that intensified dramatically after an attempted coup last year.

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Trade and security will be the dominant issues despite a crackdown by the Turkish president on thousands of opponents

Theresa May plans to focus on trade and security cooperation in talks with Turkish leaders in Ankara on Saturday, amid growing concerns about the country’s human rights record.

Thousands of journalists and political critics have been jailed in a crackdown on President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s opponents that intensified dramatically after an attempted coup last year.

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Alleged hacker held in Prague at center of ‘intense’ US-Russia tug of war

Yevgeniy Nikulin faces extradition requests from both countries amid lingering disquiet over Moscow’s alleged interference in the US presidential election

An alleged computer hacker being held in the Czech Republic is at the centre of an international legal tussle between the United States and Russia amid lingering disquiet over Moscow’s alleged interference in the recent US presidential election.

Yevgeniy Nikulin, 29, faces extradition requests from both countries after being detained by Czech police on an Interpol arrest warrant issued by US authorities.

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Yevgeniy Nikulin faces extradition requests from both countries amid lingering disquiet over Moscow’s alleged interference in the US presidential election

An alleged computer hacker being held in the Czech Republic is at the centre of an international legal tussle between the United States and Russia amid lingering disquiet over Moscow’s alleged interference in the recent US presidential election.

Yevgeniy Nikulin, 29, faces extradition requests from both countries after being detained by Czech police on an Interpol arrest warrant issued by US authorities.

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‘Penelope-gate’ casts dark shadow over Fillon’s presidential prospects

Investigation into possible misuse of public funds bodes ill for French candidate who cast himself as a sleaze-free, austere figure

It is the first major political scandal to hit the French presidential race and it could prove fatal.

The rightwing presidential candidate, François Fillon, who built his campaign on the carefully crafted image of a sleaze-free honourable country gentleman, is facing a preliminary investigation by state financial prosecutors into possible misuse of public funds. It came about after a newspaper alleged his wife was paid €500,000 (£430,000) out of parliamentary funds over eight years for an assistant’s job it claimed she never carried out.

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Investigation into possible misuse of public funds bodes ill for French candidate who cast himself as a sleaze-free, austere figure

It is the first major political scandal to hit the French presidential race and it could prove fatal.

The rightwing presidential candidate, François Fillon, who built his campaign on the carefully crafted image of a sleaze-free honourable country gentleman, is facing a preliminary investigation by state financial prosecutors into possible misuse of public funds. It came about after a newspaper alleged his wife was paid €500,000 (£430,000) out of parliamentary funds over eight years for an assistant’s job it claimed she never carried out.

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Totally stuffed: Cern’s electrocuted weasel to go on display

Stone marten, which met its fate at the Large Hadron Collider, to become part of Rotterdam museum’s exhibition on ill-fated human-animal interactions

The singed fur and charred feet are testament to the weasel’s last stand: an encounter with the world’s most powerful machine that was never going to end well.

Now an exhibit at the Rotterdam Natural History Museum, the stone marten met its fate when it hopped over a substation fence at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) near Geneva and was instantly electrocuted by an 18,000 volt transformer.

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Stone marten, which met its fate at the Large Hadron Collider, to become part of Rotterdam museum’s exhibition on ill-fated human-animal interactions

The singed fur and charred feet are testament to the weasel’s last stand: an encounter with the world’s most powerful machine that was never going to end well.

Now an exhibit at the Rotterdam Natural History Museum, the stone marten met its fate when it hopped over a substation fence at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) near Geneva and was instantly electrocuted by an 18,000 volt transformer.

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UN envoy Nikki Haley pledges to ‘take names’ of those who don’t support US

Trump’s new US ambassador to the United Nations says: ‘For those that don’t have our back, we will make points to respond to that accordingly’

The new US ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, has pledged to overhaul the world body and warned US allies that she will be “taking names” of countries that do not support Washington.

Related: UN funding: alarm at reports Trump will order sweeping cuts

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Trump’s new US ambassador to the United Nations says: ‘For those that don’t have our back, we will make points to respond to that accordingly’

The new US ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, has pledged to overhaul the world body and warned US allies that she will be “taking names” of countries that do not support Washington.

Related: UN funding: alarm at reports Trump will order sweeping cuts

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Children saved from Nazis by ‘British Schindler’ plan memorial to parents

Prague to host shrine recognising agonising choice of those who put their youngsters on ‘kindertransport’ trains organised by Nicholas Winton

Their 11th-hour escape on the eve of the second world war became the stuff of legend, earning international recognition for the man who organised it, Sir Nicholas Winton.

Now people spirited out of German-occupied Czechoslovakia when they were children are to pay homage to previously unsung heroes in the affair – the parents who boarded them on to Winton’s “kindertransport” trains bound for Britain in a desperate attempt to save them from the Nazis.

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Prague to host shrine recognising agonising choice of those who put their youngsters on ‘kindertransport’ trains organised by Nicholas Winton

Their 11th-hour escape on the eve of the second world war became the stuff of legend, earning international recognition for the man who organised it, Sir Nicholas Winton.

Now people spirited out of German-occupied Czechoslovakia when they were children are to pay homage to previously unsung heroes in the affair – the parents who boarded them on to Winton’s “kindertransport” trains bound for Britain in a desperate attempt to save them from the Nazis.

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Trump’s voter fraud expert owes US more than $100,000 in unpaid taxes

Gregg Phillips, who spurred Trump’s calls to investigate election results, was accused of lying in government job applications and has faced ethics allegations

The conservative activist cited by Donald Trump as an authority on voter fraud owes the US government more than $100,000 in unpaid taxes, was once accused of lying about his qualifications, and has faced several allegations of ethical impropriety.

Gregg Phillips’s unfounded claim that three million people vote illegally in the US was championed in a tweet by Trump on Friday morning, as the new administration prepares to launch what he says will be a major inquiry into the integrity of American elections. The president tweeted:

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Gregg Phillips, who spurred Trump’s calls to investigate election results, was accused of lying in government job applications and has faced ethics allegations

The conservative activist cited by Donald Trump as an authority on voter fraud owes the US government more than $100,000 in unpaid taxes, was once accused of lying about his qualifications, and has faced several allegations of ethical impropriety.

Gregg Phillips’s unfounded claim that three million people vote illegally in the US was championed in a tweet by Trump on Friday morning, as the new administration prepares to launch what he says will be a major inquiry into the integrity of American elections. The president tweeted:

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Berlin mayor to Donald Trump: ‘Don’t build this wall’

Michael Mueller says the long-divided city ‘cannot look on without comment when a country plans to build a wall’

The mayor of Germany’s once-divided capital, Berlin, Michael Mueller, offered some advice to Donald Trump on Friday: “Don’t build this wall!”

The US president, holding true to his campaign promise, this week ordered US officials to begin to design and construct a wall along the 2,000-mile (3,200-kilometre) US-Mexico border.

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Michael Mueller says the long-divided city ‘cannot look on without comment when a country plans to build a wall’

The mayor of Germany’s once-divided capital, Berlin, Michael Mueller, offered some advice to Donald Trump on Friday: “Don’t build this wall!”

The US president, holding true to his campaign promise, this week ordered US officials to begin to design and construct a wall along the 2,000-mile (3,200-kilometre) US-Mexico border.

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A whirlwind week: Trump’s first 14 official presidential actions

The president has announced actions in a range of policy areas – even before appointing key officials in federal agencies charged with implementing them

Donald Trump took 14 official presidential actions in his first week in office. While the actions do not have the force of law, they do represent the exercise of considerable power, setting priorities for federal agencies; guiding officials in their enforcement of the law and application of regulations; and in some cases reassigning funding within a particular agency.

The implementation of Trump’s most significant actions depends on their surviving any legal challenges and, in cases such as the construction of a border wall, winning support – and funding – from the Republican-controlled Congress. Other actions, such as those directing agencies to expedite pipeline permits or freeze hiring, take effect upon signing.

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The president has announced actions in a range of policy areas – even before appointing key officials in federal agencies charged with implementing them

Donald Trump took 14 official presidential actions in his first week in office. While the actions do not have the force of law, they do represent the exercise of considerable power, setting priorities for federal agencies; guiding officials in their enforcement of the law and application of regulations; and in some cases reassigning funding within a particular agency.

The implementation of Trump’s most significant actions depends on their surviving any legal challenges and, in cases such as the construction of a border wall, winning support – and funding – from the Republican-controlled Congress. Other actions, such as those directing agencies to expedite pipeline permits or freeze hiring, take effect upon signing.

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