High court overturns teaching ban on former London ‘superhead’

Greg Wallace was banned for two years last June by Department for Education, which was criticised by judge in latest case

A former London “superhead” has had his ban from teaching overturned in the high court after a judge praised his “inspirational example” as an school leader and rebuked the Department for Education (DfE) for imposing an “intrusive” sanction.

Greg Wallace, the former executive headteacher of the Best Start Federation of schools in Hackney, was banned last June for a minimum of two years by the DfE over allegations of financial misconduct.

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How burnt toast and roast potatoes became linked to cancer

Advice that overcooked starchy foods can contain acrylamide, a chemical liked to cancer, has caused a furore this week. Is it just another health scare?

In October 1997, something troubling was happened around the Hallandsås ridge in southwestern Sweden. Farmers had found cows paralysed or dead in their fields, lifeless fish were spotted floating in a local river and workers at a construction site began suffering from nausea and prickling sensations in their fingers.

Suspicion fell on a major construction project to drill a railway tunnel through the ridge. The project had been plagued by leaks and the construction company had resorted to injecting 1,400 tons of a sealant called Rhoca-Gil into tunnel walls. Tests confirmed that the sealant had leaked high levels of a toxic chemical into surrounding ground and surface water. The chemical was acrylamide.

Related: What is the real cancer risk from eating roast potatoes or toast?

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What we learned from the supreme court’s article 50 ruling – video analysis

Jon Henley explains the supreme court’s decision that compels the government to put a bill before parliament before triggering article 50, which would begin Brexit negotiations. The court ruled that while MPs must be allowed a vote on article 50, the devolved parliaments of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will not get a veto

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Jon Henley explains the supreme court’s decision that compels the government to put a bill before parliament before triggering article 50, which would begin Brexit negotiations. The court ruled that while MPs must be allowed a vote on article 50, the devolved parliaments of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will not get a veto

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Corbyn mistakenly offers condolences to family of ‘dead’ Northern Irish police officer – video

At prime minister’s questions on Wednesday, Jeremy Corbyn mistakenly offers condolences to the family of a Northern Ireland police officer who was shot at the weekend. The officer was wounded but did not die. Corbyn’s spokesperson later said that the Labour leader had meant to say that the police officer had ‘nearly died’ and that he had not intended to cause offence

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At prime minister’s questions on Wednesday, Jeremy Corbyn mistakenly offers condolences to the family of a Northern Ireland police officer who was shot at the weekend. The officer was wounded but did not die. Corbyn’s spokesperson later said that the Labour leader had meant to say that the police officer had ‘nearly died’ and that he had not intended to cause offence

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Travel and pollution warnings as UK’s cold, foggy weather continues

Motorists told to take extra care, flights are disrupted across south and air quality plunges in cities from London to Belfast

The ongoing cold, still weather is expected to send pollution levels soaring in London as freezing fog brings more disruption at airports and on the roads across the south of England.

Related: How have you been affected by fog and frost in the UK?

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Motorists told to take extra care, flights are disrupted across south and air quality plunges in cities from London to Belfast

The ongoing cold, still weather is expected to send pollution levels soaring in London as freezing fog brings more disruption at airports and on the roads across the south of England.

Related: How have you been affected by fog and frost in the UK?

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My child blossomed at a state nursery – we can’t let these places close

With 57% of maintained nursery schools rated ‘outstanding’, it seems madness for them to face cuts. If anything, their remit ought to be extended

The prospect of state-maintained nurseries closing en masse sounds the lowest note of the austerity politics. Maintained nurseries have enjoyed a level of Ofsted success that the rest of the education sector might look upon with envy. In 2015, 57% of those nurseries achieved an outstanding rating, compared with just 12% of the sector as a whole. So my wife and I were more than happy to move our youngest adopted child from his private nursery when he became eligible to attend. Six months later, I would say that that our experience of his new nursery has been similarly outstanding.

That was clear from the very first time we attended Cheveley Park, Durham. The walls were bursting with beautiful displays, and the confidence of the staff in dealing with our child meant he adapted quickly and enjoyed being there from the outset. As a result, his progress accelerated quickly. Within a month he could recognise his printed name and made a pretty good stab at writing it too. He now comes home with enough paintings and “make and dos” to fill our recycling bin twice every week, and his newfound love of drawing has wallpapered the fridge. His language skills have mushroomed, and the nursery’s structured approach to phonics is providing him with a solid base that he can build on in reception.

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With 57% of maintained nursery schools rated ‘outstanding’, it seems madness for them to face cuts. If anything, their remit ought to be extended

The prospect of state-maintained nurseries closing en masse sounds the lowest note of the austerity politics. Maintained nurseries have enjoyed a level of Ofsted success that the rest of the education sector might look upon with envy. In 2015, 57% of those nurseries achieved an outstanding rating, compared with just 12% of the sector as a whole. So my wife and I were more than happy to move our youngest adopted child from his private nursery when he became eligible to attend. Six months later, I would say that that our experience of his new nursery has been similarly outstanding.

That was clear from the very first time we attended Cheveley Park, Durham. The walls were bursting with beautiful displays, and the confidence of the staff in dealing with our child meant he adapted quickly and enjoyed being there from the outset. As a result, his progress accelerated quickly. Within a month he could recognise his printed name and made a pretty good stab at writing it too. He now comes home with enough paintings and “make and dos” to fill our recycling bin twice every week, and his newfound love of drawing has wallpapered the fridge. His language skills have mushroomed, and the nursery’s structured approach to phonics is providing him with a solid base that he can build on in reception.

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Legal aid cuts delaying prisoners’ release, court will be told

Denying people places on rehabilitation schemes affects their liberty and should entitle them to representation, say penal reform groups

Prisoners hoping to prepare for life outside jail are being forced to remain behind bars for years extra because they are no longer entitled to legal representation, the court of appeal is to be told.

Thousands of prisoners seeking places on offender behaviour courses that could pave the way to release are unable to challenge delays within the prison system because of government cuts to legal aid, three senior judges will hear next week.

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Denying people places on rehabilitation schemes affects their liberty and should entitle them to representation, say penal reform groups

Prisoners hoping to prepare for life outside jail are being forced to remain behind bars for years extra because they are no longer entitled to legal representation, the court of appeal is to be told.

Thousands of prisoners seeking places on offender behaviour courses that could pave the way to release are unable to challenge delays within the prison system because of government cuts to legal aid, three senior judges will hear next week.

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May’s Brexit white paper U-turn wrongfoots Corbyn, and Labour

Concession by PM may boost shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer but underlines pitfalls for his divided party

As every parent knows, leadership sometimes means knowing when to give in. Theresa May opened Wednesday’s prime minister’s questions with an unexpected concession – yet she still emerged victorious from her weekly bout with Jeremy Corbyn.

Rebel backbenchers in the prime minister’s own party, led by troublemaker-in-chief Anna Soubry, had united around the demand for the government to publish a formal white paper, setting out its priorities for the forthcoming negotiations.

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Concession by PM may boost shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer but underlines pitfalls for his divided party

As every parent knows, leadership sometimes means knowing when to give in. Theresa May opened Wednesday’s prime minister’s questions with an unexpected concession – yet she still emerged victorious from her weekly bout with Jeremy Corbyn.

Rebel backbenchers in the prime minister’s own party, led by troublemaker-in-chief Anna Soubry, had united around the demand for the government to publish a formal white paper, setting out its priorities for the forthcoming negotiations.

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May’s meeting with Trump: a collision of contrasting world views

The PM’s visit could be seen as a diplomatic coup, but her vision of a free-trading Britain could crash into ‘America First’

Theresa May travels to the US on Thursday to try to forge a personal and political relationship with the least predictable and, in European terms, most unpopular US president in modern times.

For all the British diplomatic pleasure that their prime minister is once again the first foreign leader through the door of a newly elected president, as John Major managed in the case of Bill Clinton in 1993, there will be wariness in Downing Street. For the first time since the second world war, the US appears to have a president who displays indifference to supporting his allies or shoring up an alliance framework.

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The PM’s visit could be seen as a diplomatic coup, but her vision of a free-trading Britain could crash into ‘America First’

Theresa May travels to the US on Thursday to try to forge a personal and political relationship with the least predictable and, in European terms, most unpopular US president in modern times.

For all the British diplomatic pleasure that their prime minister is once again the first foreign leader through the door of a newly elected president, as John Major managed in the case of Bill Clinton in 1993, there will be wariness in Downing Street. For the first time since the second world war, the US appears to have a president who displays indifference to supporting his allies or shoring up an alliance framework.

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May and Trump talks likely to reveal cracks in ‘special relationship’

British PM could struggle to negotiate good trade deal with president who has pledged to put America first

Appetite for a US trade deal with Britain appears as high in Washington as it is in London, according to interviews with politicians, with both governments anxious to demonstrate there is more to economic populism than simply a desire for protectionism.

But despite the political convergence indicated by Donald Trump’s election and the Brexit vote, Theresa May will discover the special relationship still has plenty of cracks and contradictions when she visits the White House on Friday.

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British PM could struggle to negotiate good trade deal with president who has pledged to put America first

Appetite for a US trade deal with Britain appears as high in Washington as it is in London, according to interviews with politicians, with both governments anxious to demonstrate there is more to economic populism than simply a desire for protectionism.

But despite the political convergence indicated by Donald Trump’s election and the Brexit vote, Theresa May will discover the special relationship still has plenty of cracks and contradictions when she visits the White House on Friday.

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Keynes’s economic theory voted most influential academic book on British life

A public vote to decide which scholarly book has had the greatest impact on Britain has chosen The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money

Academic texts that have shaped our society may range from John Berger’s landmark study of visual culture Ways of Seeing to Germaine Greer’s 1970 feminist classic The Female Eunuch, but when it comes to a vote to decide which was the most influential book for modern Britain, the public echoed America’s Bill Clinton: it’s the economy, stupid.

From a list of the 20 texts that shaped our times, curated by leading British academics as part of Academic Book Week, John Maynard Keynes’s The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money was voted the most significant for modern Britain.

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A public vote to decide which scholarly book has had the greatest impact on Britain has chosen The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money

Academic texts that have shaped our society may range from John Berger’s landmark study of visual culture Ways of Seeing to Germaine Greer’s 1970 feminist classic The Female Eunuch, but when it comes to a vote to decide which was the most influential book for modern Britain, the public echoed America’s Bill Clinton: it’s the economy, stupid.

From a list of the 20 texts that shaped our times, curated by leading British academics as part of Academic Book Week, John Maynard Keynes’s The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money was voted the most significant for modern Britain.

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The ‘almost human’ gorilla who drank tea and went to school

Gloucestershire historian unearths photographs of John Daniel, lowland gorilla adopted by village of Uley in 1918

John Daniel was no ordinary gorilla. For starters, he was called John Daniel. And he had his own bedroom, drank tea and cider, and could purportedly do his own washing up.

The extraordinary tale of the village that adopted its very own gorilla a century ago is told in a new local history book by a Gloucestershire historian.

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Gloucestershire historian unearths photographs of John Daniel, lowland gorilla adopted by village of Uley in 1918

John Daniel was no ordinary gorilla. For starters, he was called John Daniel. And he had his own bedroom, drank tea and cider, and could purportedly do his own washing up.

The extraordinary tale of the village that adopted its very own gorilla a century ago is told in a new local history book by a Gloucestershire historian.

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Malala Yousafzai’s UN speech set to music for International Women’s Day

BBC Radio 3 announces Kate Whitley’s composition, using statements about every girl’s right to education, will broadcast on 8 March

Malala Yousafzai’s 2013 speech to the UN, in which she spoke powerfully about every girl’s right to an education, has been set to music.

BBC Radio 3 announced it commissioned the composer Kate Whitley to set to music the text, by the schoolgirl who survived a murder attempt by the Taliban, as part of programming for International Women’s Day (IWD) on 8 March.

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BBC Radio 3 announces Kate Whitley’s composition, using statements about every girl’s right to education, will broadcast on 8 March

Malala Yousafzai’s 2013 speech to the UN, in which she spoke powerfully about every girl’s right to an education, has been set to music.

BBC Radio 3 announced it commissioned the composer Kate Whitley to set to music the text, by the schoolgirl who survived a murder attempt by the Taliban, as part of programming for International Women’s Day (IWD) on 8 March.

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English Heritage in the dock over plans for Clifford’s Tower in York

The fight to stop a visitor centre at ancient Clifford’s Tower is to go to the high court. The outcome could leave English Heritage’s bold plans to remodel the nation’s monuments in ruins

The first surprise came in February 2015 when the people of Cornwall woke up to find someone had carved a face into the rock below Tintagel Castle. Was it the act of vandals, determined to desecrate the most ancient and spiritual of all Cornish places, the very home of King Arthur? In fact, it turned out to be the work of local sculptor, Peter Graham, commissioned by the castle’s custodians, English Heritage.

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The fight to stop a visitor centre at ancient Clifford’s Tower is to go to the high court. The outcome could leave English Heritage’s bold plans to remodel the nation’s monuments in ruins

The first surprise came in February 2015 when the people of Cornwall woke up to find someone had carved a face into the rock below Tintagel Castle. Was it the act of vandals, determined to desecrate the most ancient and spiritual of all Cornish places, the very home of King Arthur? In fact, it turned out to be the work of local sculptor, Peter Graham, commissioned by the castle’s custodians, English Heritage.

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White House drops its ‘h’ in misspelling of Theresa May’s name

Staff rush to correct multiple spelling mistakes as the prime minister prepares for her meeting with president Donald Trump

Theresa May’s hopes of rebooting Britain’s special relationship with the US has suffered a slight glitch after the White House misspelled her name multiple times in the schedule for her meeting with Donald Trump on Friday.

Staff in the new administration missed the “h” out of the prime minister’s name when they laid out the running order for her meeting with the new president in Washington.

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Staff rush to correct multiple spelling mistakes as the prime minister prepares for her meeting with president Donald Trump

Theresa May’s hopes of rebooting Britain’s special relationship with the US has suffered a slight glitch after the White House misspelled her name multiple times in the schedule for her meeting with Donald Trump on Friday.

Staff in the new administration missed the “h” out of the prime minister’s name when they laid out the running order for her meeting with the new president in Washington.

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Theresa May must challenge Trump’s ‘contempt’ for climate change, say MPs

MPs from across the political spectrum say the UK prime minister must urge the US president to remain in the global Paris agreement

Prime minister Theresa May must challenge President Donald Trump’s “contempt” for environmental protection and urge him to remain in the global agreement to fight climate change, according to MPs from across the UK’s political parties.

May will meet Trump on Friday in Washington DC and has been warned by MPs that the US president’s approach to global warming could determine whether or not people around the world suffer the worst impacts of climate change, such as severe floods, storms and heatwaves.

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MPs from across the political spectrum say the UK prime minister must urge the US president to remain in the global Paris agreement

Prime minister Theresa May must challenge President Donald Trump’s “contempt” for environmental protection and urge him to remain in the global agreement to fight climate change, according to MPs from across the UK’s political parties.

May will meet Trump on Friday in Washington DC and has been warned by MPs that the US president’s approach to global warming could determine whether or not people around the world suffer the worst impacts of climate change, such as severe floods, storms and heatwaves.

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Labour MPs urge Priti Patel to stand against Trump’s ‘global gag’ rule

Six politicians have written to development secretary after US ruled it would stop supporting charities that provide women with information on abortion

MPs are calling on Priti Patel to take urgent action to support charities that provide women with information on abortion in an effort to limit the impact of one of Donald Trump’s first acts as president.

Six Labour politicians have written to the development secretary suggesting Britain takes similar steps to the Netherlands, which is planning to form an overseas fund after the US ruled that it would stop providing aid to international groups working in this area.

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Six politicians have written to development secretary after US ruled it would stop supporting charities that provide women with information on abortion

MPs are calling on Priti Patel to take urgent action to support charities that provide women with information on abortion in an effort to limit the impact of one of Donald Trump’s first acts as president.

Six Labour politicians have written to the development secretary suggesting Britain takes similar steps to the Netherlands, which is planning to form an overseas fund after the US ruled that it would stop providing aid to international groups working in this area.

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Ukip’s Paul Nuttall backs Donald Trump’s stance on torture

Party leader says if torturing someone stopped a terror attack, then ‘through gritted teeth’ he would support it

The Ukip leader, Paul Nuttall, has said techniques such as waterboarding could be justified if they saved lives, following comments by President Trump this week that torture “absolutely” works.

The issue has been one of the main focuses surrounding Theresa May’s current trip to visit the new US president. In a television interview on Wednesday, Trump said he believed waterboarding and similar tortures worked, and his country should “fight fire with fire”.

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Party leader says if torturing someone stopped a terror attack, then ‘through gritted teeth’ he would support it

The Ukip leader, Paul Nuttall, has said techniques such as waterboarding could be justified if they saved lives, following comments by President Trump this week that torture “absolutely” works.

The issue has been one of the main focuses surrounding Theresa May’s current trip to visit the new US president. In a television interview on Wednesday, Trump said he believed waterboarding and similar tortures worked, and his country should “fight fire with fire”.

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Donald Trump ‘100% behind Nato’, says Theresa May at joint White House press conference – Politics live

Rolling coverage of Donald Trump and Theresa May’s joint press conference at the White House

7.50pm GMT

The Daily Telegraph (which is pro-Brexit) likes this quote from the press conference.

“[#Brexit] will be a tremendous asset not a burden,” said Donald Trump during his joint press conference with Theresa May #MayTrump pic.twitter.com/WKvGzkBSwG

I really don’t need my country to be patronised by Trump. We’ve always had our own identity.

7.49pm GMT

Here is more on the length of the press conference. This is from the LA Times’ Mike Memoli.

Trump-May news conference clocked in at just over 18 minutes.

Last Obama-Cameron news conference: 55 minutes

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Rolling coverage of Donald Trump and Theresa May’s joint press conference at the White House

7.50pm GMT

The Daily Telegraph (which is pro-Brexit) likes this quote from the press conference.

“[#Brexit] will be a tremendous asset not a burden,” said Donald Trump during his joint press conference with Theresa May #MayTrump pic.twitter.com/WKvGzkBSwG

I really don’t need my country to be patronised by Trump. We’ve always had our own identity.

7.49pm GMT

Here is more on the length of the press conference. This is from the LA Times’ Mike Memoli.

Trump-May news conference clocked in at just over 18 minutes.

Last Obama-Cameron news conference: 55 minutes

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John Akomfrah wins Artes Mundi prize and attacks UK’s intolerance

Artist says tone of debate on migration is bleak and frightening as he is awarded £40,000 prize in Cardiff

The video artist John Akomfrah has been named the winner of this year’s Artes Mundi, the UK’s biggest prize for international contemporary art, and used the platform to berate the “bleak culture of fear and intolerance” he said had gripped Britain.

The biennial award, held in Cardiff, which comes with £40,000 prize money, focuses on artists who engage with social and political issues and the human condition.

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Artist says tone of debate on migration is bleak and frightening as he is awarded £40,000 prize in Cardiff

The video artist John Akomfrah has been named the winner of this year’s Artes Mundi, the UK’s biggest prize for international contemporary art, and used the platform to berate the “bleak culture of fear and intolerance” he said had gripped Britain.

The biennial award, held in Cardiff, which comes with £40,000 prize money, focuses on artists who engage with social and political issues and the human condition.

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UK’s super rich appear to get special deal from HMRC, says watchdog

Commons public accounts committee says failure to crack down on wealthy tax dodgers undermines confidence in system

Britain’s wealthiest people appear to get preferential treatment from HM Revenue & Customs and are not being properly pursued for outstanding tax bills, parliament’s spending watchdog has concluded.

HMRC’s failure to clamp down on rich tax dodgers is undermining confidence in the whole system, the public accounts committee said.

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Commons public accounts committee says failure to crack down on wealthy tax dodgers undermines confidence in system

Britain’s wealthiest people appear to get preferential treatment from HM Revenue & Customs and are not being properly pursued for outstanding tax bills, parliament’s spending watchdog has concluded.

HMRC’s failure to clamp down on rich tax dodgers is undermining confidence in the whole system, the public accounts committee said.

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Children saved from Nazis by ‘British Schindler’ plan memorial to parents

Prague to host shrine recognising agonising choice of those who put their youngsters on ‘kindertransport’ trains organised by Nicholas Winton

Their 11th-hour escape on the eve of the second world war became the stuff of legend, earning international recognition for the man who organised it, Sir Nicholas Winton.

Now people spirited out of German-occupied Czechoslovakia when they were children are to pay homage to previously unsung heroes in the affair – the parents who boarded them on to Winton’s “kindertransport” trains bound for Britain in a desperate attempt to save them from the Nazis.

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Prague to host shrine recognising agonising choice of those who put their youngsters on ‘kindertransport’ trains organised by Nicholas Winton

Their 11th-hour escape on the eve of the second world war became the stuff of legend, earning international recognition for the man who organised it, Sir Nicholas Winton.

Now people spirited out of German-occupied Czechoslovakia when they were children are to pay homage to previously unsung heroes in the affair – the parents who boarded them on to Winton’s “kindertransport” trains bound for Britain in a desperate attempt to save them from the Nazis.

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British woman died in Thailand after scooter drove into truck’s path

Badminton champion Rebecca Shaw was killed in accident after her friend steered vehicle across four-lane dual carriageway

An English badminton champion died in Thailand when her friend drove their scooter into the path of a truck, an inquest has heard.

Rebecca Shaw, from Bradley, near Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, was on her way to swim with elephants with Julie Robinson when the accident happened on a four-lane dual carriageway in Phuket in December 2015.

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Badminton champion Rebecca Shaw was killed in accident after her friend steered vehicle across four-lane dual carriageway

An English badminton champion died in Thailand when her friend drove their scooter into the path of a truck, an inquest has heard.

Rebecca Shaw, from Bradley, near Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, was on her way to swim with elephants with Julie Robinson when the accident happened on a four-lane dual carriageway in Phuket in December 2015.

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IPCC investigates police officer’s comments to black DJ he pulled over

DMO Deejay posted video showing officer saying black people in ‘gangster-style clothing’ were more likely to be stopped

The police watchdog has launched an investigation after an officer pulled over a DJ driving a Bentley in central London and told him that black people driving in “gangster-style clothing” are more likely to be stopped.

DMO Deejay, 27, who plays weekly at the Dstrkt nightclub in Leicester Square, posted a video on YouTube, taken in early January, of him being pulled over by police while driving the Bentley GTC convertible in Piccadilly.

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DMO Deejay posted video showing officer saying black people in ‘gangster-style clothing’ were more likely to be stopped

The police watchdog has launched an investigation after an officer pulled over a DJ driving a Bentley in central London and told him that black people driving in “gangster-style clothing” are more likely to be stopped.

DMO Deejay, 27, who plays weekly at the Dstrkt nightclub in Leicester Square, posted a video on YouTube, taken in early January, of him being pulled over by police while driving the Bentley GTC convertible in Piccadilly.

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Squatters turn oligarch’s empty London property into homeless shelter

Vast £15m home bought by Russian Andrey Goncharenko, who wants to add a pool and leisure centre, is housing about 25 people

A veteran group of squatters has occupied an empty £15m central London property purchased by a Russian oligarch in 2014 and opened it as a homeless shelter.

The extensive, five-storey Grade ll-listed Eaton Square property was bought by Andrey Goncharenko, a little-known oligarch who has bought a number of luxury properties in London in recent years.

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Vast £15m home bought by Russian Andrey Goncharenko, who wants to add a pool and leisure centre, is housing about 25 people

A veteran group of squatters has occupied an empty £15m central London property purchased by a Russian oligarch in 2014 and opened it as a homeless shelter.

The extensive, five-storey Grade ll-listed Eaton Square property was bought by Andrey Goncharenko, a little-known oligarch who has bought a number of luxury properties in London in recent years.

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Mark Zuckerberg drops lawsuits to force hundreds of Hawaiians to sell him land

Facebook CEO wrote that he did not understand history of ‘quiet title’ process, which many native Hawaiians consider a tool to dispossess them of ‘sacred’ lands

Mark Zuckerberg will drop his lawsuits against hundreds of Hawaiians to force the sale of small tracts of land within his Kauai estate, the Facebook CEO announced today in an op-ed in Kauai’s newspaper, the Garden Island.

“Upon reflection, I regret that I did not take the time to fully understand the quiet title process and its history before we moved ahead,” Zuckerberg wrote. “Now that I understand the issues better, it’s clear we made a mistake.”

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‘It’s made in Vietnam!’ At inauguration, origin of red Trump hats shocks many

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – One of the biggest cheers President Donald Trump received from supporters watching his inaugural address on Friday was his call to “buy American and hire American.”

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – One of the biggest cheers President Donald Trump received from supporters watching his inaugural address on Friday was his call to “buy American and hire American.”


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