Mentally ill patients face ‘double whammy’ of poor hospital care

Most people with mental health issues do not receive good treatment at A&E, leading to repeated visits, report finds

More than half of people with mental health problems receive a “double whammy” of poor care in general hospitals which increases patients’ risk of dying, according to a major new NHS inquiry.

Only 46% of patients with serious mental health conditions were well looked after when they attended hospital with a physical ailment such as heart trouble, a group of independent experts found.

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Most people with mental health issues do not receive good treatment at A&E, leading to repeated visits, report finds

More than half of people with mental health problems receive a “double whammy” of poor care in general hospitals which increases patients’ risk of dying, according to a major new NHS inquiry.

Only 46% of patients with serious mental health conditions were well looked after when they attended hospital with a physical ailment such as heart trouble, a group of independent experts found.

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Paramedics spend 500,000 hours outside busy A&Es, say auditors

Ambulance trusts breaching call response targets and struggling to recruit and retain staff, National Audit Office finds

Paramedics last year spent 500,000 hours outside hospitals with a patient in the back of their ambulance because A&E staff were too busy to accept them, an official inquiry has revealed.

That was the equivalent of 41,000 12-hour ambulance shifts being taken up with waiting instead of crews being able to attend to other emergencies, according to a report by the National Audit Office.

Related: Fifty-two NHS hospitals sent patients elsewhere in busiest week yet

Related: NHS will need £88bn extra by 2067, says OBR forecast

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Ambulance trusts breaching call response targets and struggling to recruit and retain staff, National Audit Office finds

Paramedics last year spent 500,000 hours outside hospitals with a patient in the back of their ambulance because A&E staff were too busy to accept them, an official inquiry has revealed.

That was the equivalent of 41,000 12-hour ambulance shifts being taken up with waiting instead of crews being able to attend to other emergencies, according to a report by the National Audit Office.

Related: Fifty-two NHS hospitals sent patients elsewhere in busiest week yet

Related: NHS will need £88bn extra by 2067, says OBR forecast

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Jeremy Hunt’s hospital food revolution has failed, campaigners say

Department of Health study shows almost half of hospitals in England have not implemented key improvements

Jeremy Hunt has been accused of failing to deliver his promised revolution in hospital food after the health secretary’s own department found that many hospitals have still not improved patient catering.

A Department of Health study shows that almost half of hospitals in England have failed to implement key improvements almost two and a half years after Hunt’s crackdown.

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Department of Health study shows almost half of hospitals in England have not implemented key improvements

Jeremy Hunt has been accused of failing to deliver his promised revolution in hospital food after the health secretary’s own department found that many hospitals have still not improved patient catering.

A Department of Health study shows that almost half of hospitals in England have failed to implement key improvements almost two and a half years after Hunt’s crackdown.

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First human-pig ‘chimera’ created in milestone study

Prospect of growing human organs for transplantation raised by creation of first ever embryos combining two large, distantly related species

Scientists have created a human-pig hybrid in a milestone study that raises the prospect of being able to grow human organs inside animals for use in transplants.

It marks the first time that embryos combining two large, distantly-related species have been produced. The creation of this so-called chimera – named after the cross-species beast of Greek mythology – has been hailed as a significant first step towards generating human hearts, livers and kidneys from scratch.

Related: Human-pig embryos Q&A: how would ‘chimeras’ make transplant organs?

Related: Human-pig chimeras and the history of xenotransplantation

Related: ‘Chimera’ monkeys created in lab by combining several embryos into one

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Prospect of growing human organs for transplantation raised by creation of first ever embryos combining two large, distantly related species

Scientists have created a human-pig hybrid in a milestone study that raises the prospect of being able to grow human organs inside animals for use in transplants.

It marks the first time that embryos combining two large, distantly-related species have been produced. The creation of this so-called chimera – named after the cross-species beast of Greek mythology – has been hailed as a significant first step towards generating human hearts, livers and kidneys from scratch.

Related: Human-pig embryos Q&A: how would ‘chimeras’ make transplant organs?

Related: Human-pig chimeras and the history of xenotransplantation

Related: ‘Chimera’ monkeys created in lab by combining several embryos into one

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U.S. government scientists go ‘rogue’ in defiance of Trump

(Reuters) – Rogue Twitter feeds voicing employee concerns at more than a dozen U.S. government agencies have been launched in defiance of what they say are President Donald Trump’s attempts to muzzle federal climate change research and other science.

(Reuters) – Rogue Twitter feeds voicing employee concerns at more than a dozen U.S. government agencies have been launched in defiance of what they say are President Donald Trump’s attempts to muzzle federal climate change research and other science.


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Nuclear ‘Doomsday Clock’ ticks closest to midnight in 64 years

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Atomic scientists reset their symbolic “Doomsday Clock” to its closest time to midnight in 64 years on Thursday, saying the world was closer to catastrophe due to threats such as nuclear weapons, climate change and Donald Trump’s election as U.S. president.

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Atomic scientists reset their symbolic “Doomsday Clock” to its closest time to midnight in 64 years on Thursday, saying the world was closer to catastrophe due to threats such as nuclear weapons, climate change and Donald Trump’s election as U.S. president.


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One in four genocide survivors in UK have faced abuse, poll finds

More relatives of survivors deal with racial or religious hatred, according to research released to mark Holocaust Memorial Day

More than one-quarter of survivors of the Holocaust and the genocides that followed who are living in the UK have experienced discrimination or abuse linked to their religion or ethnicity, research released to mark Holocaust Memorial Day shows.

The figure is higher for survivors’ relatives, with 38% saying they have experienced racial or religious hatred, according to the poll released by the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust (HMDT) on Friday.

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UK’s super rich appear to get special deal from HMRC, says watchdog

Commons public accounts committee says failure to crack down on wealthy tax dodgers undermines confidence in system

Britain’s wealthiest people appear to get preferential treatment from HM Revenue & Customs and are not being properly pursued for outstanding tax bills, parliament’s spending watchdog has concluded.

HMRC’s failure to clamp down on rich tax dodgers is undermining confidence in the whole system, the public accounts committee said.

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‘It adds up’

According to industry commentators, the extension of the right to request flexible working to all employees is yet to level the playing field.According to industry commentators, the extension of the right to request flexible working to all employees is yet to level the playing field.

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Why Maoist cult whistleblower is fighting to clear jailed leader’s name

Josephine Herivel, who told a charity Aravindan Balakrishnan’s daughter was being held against her will, now believes he was wrongly jailed for rape and assault

Before Josephine Herivel joined Aravindan Balakrishnan’s Maoist cult in 1976 she was set for musical stardom. As a child, she stunned judges with faultless violin recitals, the Royal College of Music awarded her a scholarship and she was on course to go to New York’s Juilliard conservatory. But her bow was not welcome inside the Workers’ Institute of Marxism-Leninism-Mao Zedong Thought.

“Comrade Bala” ran the Brixton collective using violence, intimidation and fear, a court heard in December. In a few weeks, the 75-year-old will be sentenced for rape, sexual assault and assault of two members and false imprisonment and cruelty towards his daughter, Fran, who spent the first 30 years of her life inside the cult.

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Josephine Herivel, who told a charity Aravindan Balakrishnan’s daughter was being held against her will, now believes he was wrongly jailed for rape and assault

Before Josephine Herivel joined Aravindan Balakrishnan’s Maoist cult in 1976 she was set for musical stardom. As a child, she stunned judges with faultless violin recitals, the Royal College of Music awarded her a scholarship and she was on course to go to New York’s Juilliard conservatory. But her bow was not welcome inside the Workers’ Institute of Marxism-Leninism-Mao Zedong Thought.

“Comrade Bala” ran the Brixton collective using violence, intimidation and fear, a court heard in December. In a few weeks, the 75-year-old will be sentenced for rape, sexual assault and assault of two members and false imprisonment and cruelty towards his daughter, Fran, who spent the first 30 years of her life inside the cult.

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Bath’s Conservative cabinet backs controversial park-and-ride project

Proposal for 800-space car park approved after four-hour meeting, but plans face fierce opposition from residents and opposition councillors

A proposal to create a park-and-ride site on water meadows on the edge of Bath has been backed by the city’s Conservative cabinet despite claims that the project would put its world heritage status at risk.

Related: Bath park and ride project will ruin historic landscape, say critics

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Proposal for 800-space car park approved after four-hour meeting, but plans face fierce opposition from residents and opposition councillors

A proposal to create a park-and-ride site on water meadows on the edge of Bath has been backed by the city’s Conservative cabinet despite claims that the project would put its world heritage status at risk.

Related: Bath park and ride project will ruin historic landscape, say critics

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Students ‘given dose equivalent to 300 coffees’ in botched test

Northumbria University fined £400,000 after researchers gave students 100 times intended amount of caffeine

A university has been fined £400,000 after two students were left fighting for their lives after they were accidentally given the equivalent of 300 cups of coffee in a botched experiment.

Northumbria University told Newcastle crown court it was “deeply, genuinely sorry” after sports science students Alex Rossetto and Luke Parkin were each given the massive dose of caffeine. They were admitted to intensive care for dialysis after the calculation error led to violent side-effects.

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Northumbria University fined £400,000 after researchers gave students 100 times intended amount of caffeine

A university has been fined £400,000 after two students were left fighting for their lives after they were accidentally given the equivalent of 300 cups of coffee in a botched experiment.

Northumbria University told Newcastle crown court it was “deeply, genuinely sorry” after sports science students Alex Rossetto and Luke Parkin were each given the massive dose of caffeine. They were admitted to intensive care for dialysis after the calculation error led to violent side-effects.

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‘The real Q is a woman’: boss of MI6 makes pitch for female recruits

Sir Alex Younger, speaking at Women in IT Awards, says James Bond films give MI6 a global profile – but their stereotypes are not entirely accurate

The agent known as Q, inventive head of gadgets at the UK spy agency MI6, has always been portrayed in the James Bond movies as a man. But the real head of Britain’s secret service, Sir Alex Younger, revealed on Wednesday night that Q is in fact a woman.

Younger, traditionally known as C, delivered the keynote speech at the Women in IT Awards in London in which he appealed for more women to join MI6, especially those with a scientific or technological background. “If any of you would like to join us … the real-life Q is looking forward to meeting you and I’m pleased to report that the real-life Q is a woman,” he said.

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Sir Alex Younger, speaking at Women in IT Awards, says James Bond films give MI6 a global profile – but their stereotypes are not entirely accurate

The agent known as Q, inventive head of gadgets at the UK spy agency MI6, has always been portrayed in the James Bond movies as a man. But the real head of Britain’s secret service, Sir Alex Younger, revealed on Wednesday night that Q is in fact a woman.

Younger, traditionally known as C, delivered the keynote speech at the Women in IT Awards in London in which he appealed for more women to join MI6, especially those with a scientific or technological background. “If any of you would like to join us … the real-life Q is looking forward to meeting you and I’m pleased to report that the real-life Q is a woman,” he said.

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What we learned from the supreme court’s article 50 ruling – video analysis

Jon Henley explains the supreme court’s decision that compels the government to put a bill before parliament before triggering article 50, which would begin Brexit negotiations. The court ruled that while MPs must be allowed a vote on article 50, the devolved parliaments of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will not get a veto

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Jon Henley explains the supreme court’s decision that compels the government to put a bill before parliament before triggering article 50, which would begin Brexit negotiations. The court ruled that while MPs must be allowed a vote on article 50, the devolved parliaments of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will not get a veto

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Corbyn mistakenly offers condolences to family of ‘dead’ Northern Irish police officer – video

At prime minister’s questions on Wednesday, Jeremy Corbyn mistakenly offers condolences to the family of a Northern Ireland police officer who was shot at the weekend. The officer was wounded but did not die. Corbyn’s spokesperson later said that the Labour leader had meant to say that the police officer had ‘nearly died’ and that he had not intended to cause offence

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At prime minister’s questions on Wednesday, Jeremy Corbyn mistakenly offers condolences to the family of a Northern Ireland police officer who was shot at the weekend. The officer was wounded but did not die. Corbyn’s spokesperson later said that the Labour leader had meant to say that the police officer had ‘nearly died’ and that he had not intended to cause offence

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Travel and pollution warnings as UK’s cold, foggy weather continues

Motorists told to take extra care, flights are disrupted across south and air quality plunges in cities from London to Belfast

The ongoing cold, still weather is expected to send pollution levels soaring in London as freezing fog brings more disruption at airports and on the roads across the south of England.

Related: How have you been affected by fog and frost in the UK?

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Motorists told to take extra care, flights are disrupted across south and air quality plunges in cities from London to Belfast

The ongoing cold, still weather is expected to send pollution levels soaring in London as freezing fog brings more disruption at airports and on the roads across the south of England.

Related: How have you been affected by fog and frost in the UK?

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May’s Brexit white paper U-turn wrongfoots Corbyn, and Labour

Concession by PM may boost shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer but underlines pitfalls for his divided party

As every parent knows, leadership sometimes means knowing when to give in. Theresa May opened Wednesday’s prime minister’s questions with an unexpected concession – yet she still emerged victorious from her weekly bout with Jeremy Corbyn.

Rebel backbenchers in the prime minister’s own party, led by troublemaker-in-chief Anna Soubry, had united around the demand for the government to publish a formal white paper, setting out its priorities for the forthcoming negotiations.

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Concession by PM may boost shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer but underlines pitfalls for his divided party

As every parent knows, leadership sometimes means knowing when to give in. Theresa May opened Wednesday’s prime minister’s questions with an unexpected concession – yet she still emerged victorious from her weekly bout with Jeremy Corbyn.

Rebel backbenchers in the prime minister’s own party, led by troublemaker-in-chief Anna Soubry, had united around the demand for the government to publish a formal white paper, setting out its priorities for the forthcoming negotiations.

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May’s meeting with Trump: a collision of contrasting world views

The PM’s visit could be seen as a diplomatic coup, but her vision of a free-trading Britain could crash into ‘America First’

Theresa May travels to the US on Thursday to try to forge a personal and political relationship with the least predictable and, in European terms, most unpopular US president in modern times.

For all the British diplomatic pleasure that their prime minister is once again the first foreign leader through the door of a newly elected president, as John Major managed in the case of Bill Clinton in 1993, there will be wariness in Downing Street. For the first time since the second world war, the US appears to have a president who displays indifference to supporting his allies or shoring up an alliance framework.

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The PM’s visit could be seen as a diplomatic coup, but her vision of a free-trading Britain could crash into ‘America First’

Theresa May travels to the US on Thursday to try to forge a personal and political relationship with the least predictable and, in European terms, most unpopular US president in modern times.

For all the British diplomatic pleasure that their prime minister is once again the first foreign leader through the door of a newly elected president, as John Major managed in the case of Bill Clinton in 1993, there will be wariness in Downing Street. For the first time since the second world war, the US appears to have a president who displays indifference to supporting his allies or shoring up an alliance framework.

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May and Trump talks likely to reveal cracks in ‘special relationship’

British PM could struggle to negotiate good trade deal with president who has pledged to put America first

Appetite for a US trade deal with Britain appears as high in Washington as it is in London, according to interviews with politicians, with both governments anxious to demonstrate there is more to economic populism than simply a desire for protectionism.

But despite the political convergence indicated by Donald Trump’s election and the Brexit vote, Theresa May will discover the special relationship still has plenty of cracks and contradictions when she visits the White House on Friday.

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British PM could struggle to negotiate good trade deal with president who has pledged to put America first

Appetite for a US trade deal with Britain appears as high in Washington as it is in London, according to interviews with politicians, with both governments anxious to demonstrate there is more to economic populism than simply a desire for protectionism.

But despite the political convergence indicated by Donald Trump’s election and the Brexit vote, Theresa May will discover the special relationship still has plenty of cracks and contradictions when she visits the White House on Friday.

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Blackpool’s beach pleasures: nostalgia and neglect at the seaside – in pictures

Dawn Mander’s photographs of her hometown capture a faded seaside resort in need of investment – but the culture of entertainment lives on

Dawn Mander is a “sandgrown’un” – a person born and bred in Blackpool, the UK seaside resort famous for its Pleasure Beach amusement park. Mander’s photographs of the town try to provide an honest portrait of a place which – despite its late 19th-century and early 20th-century heyday as a booming holiday destination – has seen economic decline as the rise of cheap international travel took visitors elsewhere. The town is now the most Eurosceptic place in the north-west of England and pro-Brexit (despite EU laws being responsible for its beaches getting cleaner and safer).

The dent in the tourism industry took its toll on the town’s landscape. “I love Blackpool, I think it’s a great place to live and grow up, but there’s still a huge amount that needs doing to rejuvenate the town,” says Mander. “Many areas, especially those away from the main promenade, are very neglected with streets of closed and often derelict shops. I would love to see more investment in those areas, restoring the faded glamour and kitsch that I so love trying to capture in my photography.”

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Dawn Mander’s photographs of her hometown capture a faded seaside resort in need of investment – but the culture of entertainment lives on

Dawn Mander is a “sandgrown’un” – a person born and bred in Blackpool, the UK seaside resort famous for its Pleasure Beach amusement park. Mander’s photographs of the town try to provide an honest portrait of a place which – despite its late 19th-century and early 20th-century heyday as a booming holiday destination – has seen economic decline as the rise of cheap international travel took visitors elsewhere. The town is now the most Eurosceptic place in the north-west of England and pro-Brexit (despite EU laws being responsible for its beaches getting cleaner and safer).

The dent in the tourism industry took its toll on the town’s landscape. “I love Blackpool, I think it’s a great place to live and grow up, but there’s still a huge amount that needs doing to rejuvenate the town,” says Mander. “Many areas, especially those away from the main promenade, are very neglected with streets of closed and often derelict shops. I would love to see more investment in those areas, restoring the faded glamour and kitsch that I so love trying to capture in my photography.”

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Keynes’s economic theory voted most influential academic book on British life

A public vote to decide which scholarly book has had the greatest impact on Britain has chosen The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money

Academic texts that have shaped our society may range from John Berger’s landmark study of visual culture Ways of Seeing to Germaine Greer’s 1970 feminist classic The Female Eunuch, but when it comes to a vote to decide which was the most influential book for modern Britain, the public echoed America’s Bill Clinton: it’s the economy, stupid.

From a list of the 20 texts that shaped our times, curated by leading British academics as part of Academic Book Week, John Maynard Keynes’s The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money was voted the most significant for modern Britain.

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A public vote to decide which scholarly book has had the greatest impact on Britain has chosen The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money

Academic texts that have shaped our society may range from John Berger’s landmark study of visual culture Ways of Seeing to Germaine Greer’s 1970 feminist classic The Female Eunuch, but when it comes to a vote to decide which was the most influential book for modern Britain, the public echoed America’s Bill Clinton: it’s the economy, stupid.

From a list of the 20 texts that shaped our times, curated by leading British academics as part of Academic Book Week, John Maynard Keynes’s The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money was voted the most significant for modern Britain.

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The ‘almost human’ gorilla who drank tea and went to school

Gloucestershire historian unearths photographs of John Daniel, lowland gorilla adopted by village of Uley in 1918

John Daniel was no ordinary gorilla. For starters, he was called John Daniel. And he had his own bedroom, drank tea and cider, and could purportedly do his own washing up.

The extraordinary tale of the village that adopted its very own gorilla a century ago is told in a new local history book by a Gloucestershire historian.

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Gloucestershire historian unearths photographs of John Daniel, lowland gorilla adopted by village of Uley in 1918

John Daniel was no ordinary gorilla. For starters, he was called John Daniel. And he had his own bedroom, drank tea and cider, and could purportedly do his own washing up.

The extraordinary tale of the village that adopted its very own gorilla a century ago is told in a new local history book by a Gloucestershire historian.

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Malala Yousafzai’s UN speech set to music for International Women’s Day

BBC Radio 3 announces Kate Whitley’s composition, using statements about every girl’s right to education, will broadcast on 8 March

Malala Yousafzai’s 2013 speech to the UN, in which she spoke powerfully about every girl’s right to an education, has been set to music.

BBC Radio 3 announced it commissioned the composer Kate Whitley to set to music the text, by the schoolgirl who survived a murder attempt by the Taliban, as part of programming for International Women’s Day (IWD) on 8 March.

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BBC Radio 3 announces Kate Whitley’s composition, using statements about every girl’s right to education, will broadcast on 8 March

Malala Yousafzai’s 2013 speech to the UN, in which she spoke powerfully about every girl’s right to an education, has been set to music.

BBC Radio 3 announced it commissioned the composer Kate Whitley to set to music the text, by the schoolgirl who survived a murder attempt by the Taliban, as part of programming for International Women’s Day (IWD) on 8 March.

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Jeremy Hunt’s hospital food revolution has failed, campaigners say

Department of Health study shows almost half of hospitals in England have not implemented key improvements

Jeremy Hunt has been accused of failing to deliver his promised revolution in hospital food after the health secretary’s own department found that many hospitals have still not improved patient catering.

A Department of Health study shows that almost half of hospitals in England have failed to implement key improvements almost two and a half years after Hunt’s crackdown.

Continue reading…

Department of Health study shows almost half of hospitals in England have not implemented key improvements

Jeremy Hunt has been accused of failing to deliver his promised revolution in hospital food after the health secretary’s own department found that many hospitals have still not improved patient catering.

A Department of Health study shows that almost half of hospitals in England have failed to implement key improvements almost two and a half years after Hunt’s crackdown.

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Brexit ‘turf wars’ between ministries hindering progress, says report

Staff cuts and squabbles between departments are wasting time and energy as government attempts to implement Brexit plan, IfG says

Theresa May’s government is facing inter-departmental squabbles, concerns over staffing levels and “big challenges” drawing up legislation as it attempts to implement a Brexit strategy, analysis by Whitehall’s leading thinktank has found.

“Turf wars” between key departments led by Boris Johnson, David Davis and Liam Fox have been a distraction, wasting time and energy, the Institute for Government (IfG) report said.

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Staff cuts and squabbles between departments are wasting time and energy as government attempts to implement Brexit plan, IfG says

Theresa May’s government is facing inter-departmental squabbles, concerns over staffing levels and “big challenges” drawing up legislation as it attempts to implement a Brexit strategy, analysis by Whitehall’s leading thinktank has found.

“Turf wars” between key departments led by Boris Johnson, David Davis and Liam Fox have been a distraction, wasting time and energy, the Institute for Government (IfG) report said.

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Car firms tell May post-Brexit tariffs are ‘red line’ issue that threatens jobs

Britain must keep some benefits of single market and customs union after Brexit, says chief executive of trade body SMMT

The car industry has told Theresa May that the introduction of tariffs after Britain leaves the EU is a “red line” issue that would lead to a fall in sales and potentially result in job losses.

In a severe warning about the consequences of a hard Brexit, Mike Hawes, the chief executive of the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, said tariffs would make UK car plants uncompetitive and it was critical that any trade deal with the EU contained some of the benefits of the single market and customs union.

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Britain must keep some benefits of single market and customs union after Brexit, says chief executive of trade body SMMT

The car industry has told Theresa May that the introduction of tariffs after Britain leaves the EU is a “red line” issue that would lead to a fall in sales and potentially result in job losses.

In a severe warning about the consequences of a hard Brexit, Mike Hawes, the chief executive of the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, said tariffs would make UK car plants uncompetitive and it was critical that any trade deal with the EU contained some of the benefits of the single market and customs union.

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